XO-5

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XO-5
Observation data
Epoch 2000      Equinox 2000
Constellation Lynx[1]
Right ascension 07h 46m 51.959s[2]
Declination +39° 05′ 40.46″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 12.13 ± 0.03[3]
Characteristics
Spectral type G8V[3]
Apparent magnitude (V) 12.13 ± 0.03[3]
Apparent magnitude (R) 11.844[2]
Apparent magnitude (J) 10.774 ± 0.019[4]
Apparent magnitude (H) 10.443 ± 0.021[4]
Apparent magnitude (K) 10.345 ± 0.018[4]
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: -32.2 ± 2.8[2] mas/yr
Dec.: -22.9 ± 4.9[2] mas/yr
Distance 848 ± 39[5] ly
(260 ± 12[5] pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 5.06 ± 0.12[5]
Details
Mass 0.88 ± 0.03[5] M
Radius 1.08 ± 0.04[5] R
Luminosity 0.88 ± 0.09[5] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.31 ± 0.03[5] cgs
Temperature 5370 ± 70[5] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] +0.05 ± 0.06[5] dex
Age 14.8 ± 2.0[5] Gyr
Other designations
GSC 02959-00729, 2MASS J07465196+3905404, UCAC2 45499774 [6]

XO-5 is a yellow dwarf main sequence star located approximately 850 light-years away from Earth in the Lynx constellation. It has a magnitude of about 12 and cannot be seen with the naked eye but is visible through a small telescope.[3][5]

Planetary system[edit]

The exoplanet XO-5b was discovered by the XO Telescope using the transit method in 2008. This planet is classified as a hot jupiter.[3] A search for transit timing variations caused by additional planets was negative.[7]

The XO-5 planetary system[5][8]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b 1.059 ± 0.028 MJ 0.0488 ± 0.0006 4.1877545 ± 0.0000016 0[note 1]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ eccentricity is insignificant compared to its uncertainties[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roman, Nancy G. (1987). "Identification of a Constellation From a Position". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 99 (617): 695–699. Bibcode:1987PASP...99..695R. doi:10.1086/132034.  Vizier query form
  2. ^ a b c d e Zacharias et al. (2009). "3UC===259-099032". Third U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog. Retrieved 2012-02-21. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Burke, Christopher J. et al. (2008). "XO-5b: A Transiting Jupiter-sized Planet with a 4 day Period". The Astrophysical Journal 686 (2): 1331–1340. arXiv:0805.2399. Bibcode:2008ApJ...686.1331B. doi:10.1086/591497. 
  4. ^ a b c Cutri et al. (2003). "2MASS===07465196+3905404". 2MASS All-Sky Catalog of Point Sources. Retrieved 2012-02-20. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Pál, A. et al. (2009). "Independent Confirmation and Refined Parameters of the Hot Jupiter XO-5b". The Astrophysical Journal 700 (1): 783–790. arXiv:0810.0260. Bibcode:2009ApJ...700..783P. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/700/1/783. 
  6. ^ "SIMBAD query result: GSC 02959-00729 -- Star". Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2009-04-26. 
  7. ^ Maciejewski, G. et al. (2011). "Refining Parameters of the XO-5 Planetary System with High-Precision Transit Photometry". Acta Astronomica 61 (1): 25–35. arXiv:1103.1325. Bibcode:2011AcA....61...25M. 
  8. ^ Sada, Pedro V. et al. (2012). "Extrasolar Planet Transits Observed at Kitt Peak National Observatory". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 124 (913): 212–229. arXiv:1202.2799. Bibcode:2012PASP..124..212S. doi:10.1086/665043. 

External links[edit]

  • "XO-5". Exoplanets. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 

Coordinates: Sky map 07h 46m 51.959s, +39° 05′ 40.47″