XX/XY

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For the human sex-determination system, see XY sex-determination system.
For the film XXXY, see XXXY (film).
XX/XY
XX XY (movie poster).jpg
DVD cover
Directed by Austin Chick
Produced by Mitchell Robbins
Isen Robbins
Aimee Schoof
Written by Austin Chick
Starring Mark Ruffalo
Maya Stange
Kathleen Robertson
Music by The Insects
Cinematography Uta Briesewitz
Edited by William A. Anderson
Pete Beaudreau
Production
company
Distributed by IFC Films
Release dates
  • January 11, 2002 (2002-01-11)
Running time
91 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $104,130[1]

XX/XY is a 2002 American romantic drama film starring Mark Ruffalo, Kathleen Robertson and Maya Stange. The film is a romantic drama written and directed by Austin Chick, the title referring to the different chromosome pairings present in men and women. It was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in the year it was released. Although the funding for the film came from the US, the film was produced by British company Natural Nylon.

Plot[edit]

Two college students, Sam (Maya Stange) and Thea (Kathleen Robertson), meet Coles (Mark Ruffalo), an animator, at a party, and their mutual attraction leads to a passionate and awkward night together. They form an unstable friendship, and continue to push their sexual boundaries. Soon, their friendships are tested by Sam and Coles' romance and Thea's increasingly reckless behavior. Inevitably, their relationships dissolve due to fear, resentment and mistrust on all sides.

Eight years later, they reunite. Coles, now an animator for a high-profile ad agency, lives with Claire (Petra Wright), his girlfriend of five years. Thea, the former wild-child is happily married to Miles (David Thornton), with whom she shares ownership of a very successful and flourishing restaurant. Sam has returned to Manhattan from London after breaking off her engagement. Upon reconnecting, the three are drawn back into their old and complicated dynamic. They are soon forced to confront the true meaning of commitment and love, something they avoided as young adults.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

XX/XY received mixed reviews; it currently holds a 44% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, the consensus states, "The characters are both unsympathetic and uninteresting."[2]

References[edit]

External links[edit]