Xenophon Hicks

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Xenophon Hicks (May 2, 1872 – November 2, 1952) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Clinton, Tennessee, Hicks received an A.B. from Grant University in 1891 and an LL.B. from Cumberland University in 1892. He was in private practice in Clinton, Tennessee from 1892 to 1898. He was a city attorney of Clinton from 1892 to 1893, and a county attorney of Anderson County, Tennessee from 1894 to 1896. He joined the United States Army in 1898, later serving as an alderman and mayor of Clinton. He became a member of the Tennessee State Senate in 1911, and was an assistant state attorney general of 2nd Judicial Circuit of Tennessee from 1911 to 1913. He was a judge of the Criminal and Law Court, 2nd Judicial Circuit of Tennessee from 1913 to 1918, and was a judge on the 19th Circuit Court of Tennessee from 1918 to 1923.

On February 28, 1923, Hicks was nominated by President Warren G. Harding to a seat in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee and in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee, both vacated by Edward T. Sanford. Hicks was confirmed by the United States Senate on March 2, 1923, and received his commission the same day.

On May 19, 1928, President Calvin Coolidge nominated Hicks to a new seat in the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit created by 45 Stat. 492. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 23, 1928, receiving his commission the same day. He served as chief judge from 1948 to 1952. He assumed senior status on March 1, 1952, serving in that capacity until his death.

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