Xian Y-20

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Y-20
Xian Y-20 at the 2014 Zhuhai Air Show.jpg
Y-20 at Zhuhai Airshow 2014
Role Strategic airlifter
National origin People Republic of China
Manufacturer Xi'an Aircraft Industrial Corporation
Designer Tang Changhong / 唐长红
First flight 26 January 2013
Status Under development
Primary user PLA Air Force
Number built 3 prototypes [1]

The Xian Y-20 (Chinese: 运-20) is a large military transport aircraft. The project is being developed by Xi'an Aircraft Industrial Corporation and was officially launched in 2006.[2] The official codename of the aircraft is Kunpeng, (Chinese: 鲲鹏).[3] after the mythical bird of ancient China that can fly for thousands of kilometres.[4] The chief designer of the Y-20 is Tang Changhong (Chinese: 唐长红).[5]

The first Y-20 prototype is powered by four D-30 series turbofan engines and the production aircraft May be equipped with WS-20 engines, which is derived from the WS-10 turbofan engine currently powering the J-11B fighters in PLAAF. The WS-20 engine is essentially a WS-10A engine with high by pass ratio around 6.2, it produces around 132Kn of thrust and does not have the military after burning nozzle.[6]

Cargo is loaded through a large aft ramp that accommodates rolling stock. The Y-20 incorporates a high-set wing, T-tail, rear cargo-loading assembly and heavy-duty retractable landing gear.

It was reported that the Y-20 started ground testing from December 2012, including runway taxi tests.[7][8][9][10] The aircraft made its maiden flight lasting one hour on January 26, 2013.[11][12][13] During landing in first flight, it was reported that the Y-20 prototype bounced once before finally settling on runway due to high landing speed.[14]

In December 2013, a new Y-20 prototype took to the sky.[1]

The Y-20 is the first cargo aircraft to use 3-D printing technology to speed up its development and to lower its manufacturing cost.[15]

Chinese air force demand[edit]

According to Chinese sources, the Chinese air force PLAAF will need at least 300-400 Y-20 aircraft to conduct military operations in different battlefronts along the Asia-Pacific region as well as to catch up with capabilities of the U.S and Russia. This will require XAC to open two production lines and run for 10 years or 15 years.[16][17]

Specifications (estimated)[edit]

General characteristics

Performance

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b http://net.chinabyte.com/351/12807851.shtml
  2. ^ "China's first heavy transporter Y-20 takes off". english.people.com.cn. Retrieved 26 Jan 2013. 
  3. ^ "Y-20 gives air power a push". chinadaily.com.cn. Retrieved 28 Jan 2013. 
  4. ^ Dave Sloggett, "THE DRAGON Gains its Strategic Wings" Air International, March 2013, pp. 94-95
  5. ^ a b "New jumbo transport jet completes more tests". East Day. Retrieved 5 March 2013. 
  6. ^ http://www.janes.com/article/31880/china-marks-aviation-milestones-with-j-10b-production-second-y-20-prototype-flight
  7. ^ "Y-20 transport aircraft starts testing, first flight completed". AirForceWorld.com. Retrieved 24 Dec 2012. 
  8. ^ "Chinese Y-20 revealed in new online pictures". Flightglobal.com. Retrieved 27 Dec 2012. 
  9. ^ "IN FOCUS: China’s new strategic airlifter". Flightglobal. Retrieved 14 Jan 2013. 
  10. ^ David Axe (4 January 2013). "Satellites Spot China’s Mysterious New Warplane". Wired. Retrieved 29 January 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "我国自主发展的运—20大型运输机首次试飞取得圆满成功". news.xinhuanet.com. Retrieved 26 Jan 2013. 
  12. ^ "视频 国产大型运输机运-20首飞成功". news.cntv.cn. Retrieved 26 Jan 2013. 
  13. ^ "视频 国产大型运输机首飞成功:我国运输机发展之路". news.cntv.cn. Retrieved 26 Jan 2013. 
  14. ^ "VIDEO:Y-20 prototype first flight completed". news.cntv.cn. Retrieved 26 Jan 2013. 
  15. ^ http://mil.huanqiu.com/mlitaryvision/2013-03/2686575.html
  16. ^ http://baike.baidu.com/redirect/c85c0qgiWQyHgKfndnFwhelJIyCgnvrTD7yboh856IMDrZr6Xuy%2BVdNKaCT%2FEI8zdi8%2BvYCdlnGw%2BK9oR1RNjAfolmePODddSJgXsV1bvXM
  17. ^ "China Eyes 400 Y-20 Cargo Planes For Military Transport". DefenseWorld.Net. Retrieved 10 November 2014. 
  18. ^ a b http://eng.chinamil.com.cn/news-channels/pla-daily-commentary/2013-01/28/content_5197556.htm