Xian Zhang

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This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhang.

Xian Zhang (Chinese: 张弦), born in 1973 in Dandong, Liaoning) is a Chinese American conductor.

As a child, Zhang began to learn music with her mother on a piano built by her father.[1][2] She continued her music studies at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. She began conducting studies at age 16, and received her bachelor's and master's degrees from the conservatory in Beijing. Her first conducting appearance was at age 19 with the China National Opera Orchestra in a production of The Marriage of Figaro.[3] She served as conductor-in-residence of the China Opera House in Beijing, and conductor of the Jinfan Symphony Orchestra.

Zhang moved to the United States in 1998.[4] She studied for her doctorate in music at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, and also served for four years as music director of the university's Concert Orchestra. In 2002, she shared in the first prize of the first Maazel/Vilar Conductors' Competition. She served as a cover conductor with the New York Philharmonic from 2002 to 2004. She became an assistant conductor with the New York Philharmonic in 2004, and her conducting debut with the orchestra was in a Young People's Concert that year. In January 2005, she made her Philharmonic subscription debut in January 2005 on a program shared with Lorin Maazel.[5] Maazel subsequently appointed Xian Zhang as the orchestra's associate conductor in 2005,[6] a post she held for several years.

Zhang served as the fifth music director of the Sioux City Symphony Orchestra from 2005 to 2007.[7] In January 2008, she became the first woman to conduct the Staatskapelle Dresden in its principal hall.[8] In March 2009, the Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano Giuseppe Verdi announced the appointment of Zhang as its next music director, the first woman to be named music director of an Italian symphony orchestra, effective with the 2009-2010 season.[9][10] In December 2010, the Nederlandse Orkest- en Ensemble-Academie (NJO; Dutch Orchestra and Ensemble Academy) named Zhang its newest artistic leader, as of the summer of 2011.[11]

Personal[edit]

Zhang lives in Manhattan with her husband Yang Lei and son Edan Yang (born 2009).[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ralph Blumenthal (2002-09-30). "And Then There Were Two; Prize Is Shared in Conductors' Competition". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  2. ^ Vivien Schweitzer (2008-02-03). "A Lengthy Journey, Nowhere Near Over". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  3. ^ Tom Service (2007-10-05). "The sounds of the future". The Guardian. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  4. ^ Blair Tindall (14 January 2005). "Call Me Madame Maestro". New York Times. Retrieved 2009-09-28. 
  5. ^ Allan Kozinn (2005-01-13). "A Young Conductor Accepts an Eclectic Assignment". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  6. ^ Anthony Tommasini (2006-03-18). "Young Conductor Enters, Bringing an Infusion of Vitality". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  7. ^ "Xian Zhang steps down as Symphony conductor". Sioux City Journal. 2007-05-11. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  8. ^ a b Bradley Bambarger (2008-07-03). "New York Philharmonic stages free concert in Holmdel". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved 2009-04-14. 
  9. ^ "Xian Zhang: è donna il nuovo Direttore Musicale della Verdi" (Press release). Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano Giuseppe Verdi. 31 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-13. 
  10. ^ Charles Searson, "Italy appoints its first female principal conductor". Gramophone, 6 April 2009.
  11. ^ "Xian Zhang nieuwe artistiek leider" (Press release). Nederlandse Orkest- en Ensemble-Academie. 14 December 2010. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Stephen Rogers Radcliffe
Music Director, Sioux City Symphony Orchestra
2005-2007
Succeeded by
Ryan Haskins
Preceded by
Riccardo Chailly
Music Director, Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano Giuseppe Verdi
2009-present
Succeeded by
incumbent