Xiao riben

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Xiao riben
Traditional Chinese
Anti-Japanese demonstrators hold a sign saying "[We] strongly condemn the Japanese!! (強烈譴責 小日本!!)" during the 2012 China anti-Japanese demonstrations in Taiwan[1]
On September 18, 2012, anti-Japanese demonstrators march with a banner saying "1.3 billion Chinese stamp on the Japanese runts" (13亿 中国人 踏平 小日本) in front of Japanese embassy in Beijing.[2]

Xiao riben (Chinese: 小日本; pinyin: xiǎo rìběn) is a derogatory Chinese slang term for the Japanese people or a person of Japanese descent. Literally translated, it means "Japanese runts" or "little Japanese" or "Puny Japanese". It is often used with "gui zi" or devil, such as Xiao ri ben gui zi or puny Japanese devil. It is regarded as an ethnic slur.[3][4]

Usage[edit]

Anti-Japanese demonstrators used the term xiao riben during the 2012 China anti-Japanese demonstrations. On September 18, 2012, anti-Japanese demonstrators held a sign saying "1.3 billion Chinese stamp on the Japanese runts" in front of the Japanese embassy in Beijing.[2] In Taiwan, anti-Japanese demonstrators also held signs that used the phrase xiao riben.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "台湾民间团体发起保钓游行". Voice of America. September 23, 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-25. 
  2. ^ a b See the photography""9.18"推升反日情绪,仇恨教育应否提倡?". Voice of America. September 18, 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-28. 
  3. ^ "The World; Why Japan Hasn't Said That Word". New York Times. May 7, 1995. Retrieved 2012-09-25. 
  4. ^ "Japanese in China Adjust to Tensions". Wall Street Journal. September 18, 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-26.