Xiaojiawan coal mine disaster

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Xiaojiawan coal mine disaster
Time 18:00 CST
Date August 29, 2012 (2012-08-29)
Location Panzhihua, Sichuan, China
Casualties
45 dead, 1 missing

The Xiaojiawan coal mine disaster was a mining accident which happened on 29 August 2012 at the Xiaojiawan coal mine (Chinese: 肖家湾煤矿), located in Panzhihua in Sichuan Province, China. It was the deadliest mine accident since the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion. As a result of a gas explosion in the Xiaojiawan coal mine, at least 45 miners were killed and 1 was still missing as of September 2.[1] 51 were sent to hospital with seven in critical condition.[2] It was reported that 16 miners died from carbon monoxide poisoning, while three others died in hospital.[3]

At the moment of explosion there were 154 miners working at the mine.[3] The shaft of the mine has been severely destroyed.[4] As of 30 August 2012, more than 300 rescuers have taken part in the rescue operation.[4] Rescue operations are complicated due to high temperatures reaching 90 °C (194 °F).[4][2]

The Xiaojiawan coal mine is an integrated coal mine with an annual output of 90,000 metric tons of coal. Its trial run started in March 2011. In December 2011, it gained a safety license.[5] The mine is owned by Zhengjin Industry and Trade Co. Ltd. Three owners of the mine were detained for investigation.[4][3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 攀枝花矿难遇难人数升至45人 尚有1人被困井下 (in Chinese). NetEase. September 2, 2012. Retrieved September 2, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Ruwitch, John (30 August 2012). "At least 26 killed, 21 missing in Chinese mine blast: Xinhua". Reuters. Retrieved 30 August 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "19 killed in coal mine blast in southwest China". Bloomberg Businessweek. Associated Press. 30 August 2012. Retrieved 30 August 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Chinese Rescuers Race to Save Trapped Miners". China Radio International. Xinhua. 30 August 2012. Retrieved 30 August 2012. 
  5. ^ "37 miners confirmed dead in Sichuan colliery blast". Asia News Network. 31 August 2012. Retrieved 31 August 2012. 

Coordinates: 26°34′39″N 101°42′7″E / 26.57750°N 101.70194°E / 26.57750; 101.70194