Y-DNA haplogroups by populations of East and Southeast Asia

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Listed here are notable groups and populations from the Far East (East and Southeast Asia) by human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups based on relevant studies.

Population Language n C D K N O1 O2 O3 Q Others Reference
Achang (Lianghe, Yunnan) Tibeto-Burman 40 5.0 0 2.5 -- -- ≥10.0 82.5 0 Shi 2005
Yang 2005
Aini (Xishuangbanna) Tibeto-Burman 52 11.5 0 -- -- 3.8 O2a=
7.7
40.4 0 K(xO1a,O2a,O3,P)
=34.6, F(xK)=1.9
Wen 2004[1]
Ainu Ainu 16 12.5 87.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tajima 2004[2]
Andamanese Andamanese 37 0 73.0 5.4 0 0 2.7 5.4 0 P=10.8 Thangaraj 2002[3]
Bali (Indonesia) Austronesian 551 1.8 0 1.1 0 18.1 58.8 6.9 0.4 H=3.4 Karafet 2005[4]
Borneo (Indonesia) Austronesian 40 5.0 0 10 0 15 37.5 17.5 -- F=5 Kayser 2002[5]
South China ST, HM 384 9.6 2.1 0.5 4.4 6.8 17.4 57.8 0.3 Karafet 2005[4]
Daur Mongolic 39 30.8 0 0 ≥7.7 ≥5.1 20.5 25.6 0 NO(xN1,O)=2.6
O(xO1a,O2,O3)=2.6
Xue 2006[6]
East Asia East Asians 988 19.9 4.8 1.9 6.4 5.4 16.3 33.7 -- R1a=2.8 Xue 2006[6]
Filipino Austronesian 50 0 0 10 0 46 -- 38 -- Tajima 2004[2]
Filipino Austronesian 115 5 -- 20 -- 28 3 39 -- S=2 Scheinfeldt 2006[7]
Garo Tibeto-Burman 71 8.5 0 -- -- -- ≥11.3 59.2 -- H1a=1.4, P=7.0
F(xH,J2,K)=4.2
O(xO2a,O3)=4.2
K(xL,O,P)=4.2
Reddy 2007[8]
Han (China) Sinitic 166 6.0 0.6 1.2 9.0 9.6 16.3 55.4 0.6 Karafet 2005[4]
Han (Chengdu, Sichuan) Sinitic 34 11.8 0 0 2.9 14.7 17.6 52.9 0 Xue 2006[6]
Han (Meixian, Guangdong) Sinitic 35 8.6 0 2.9 2.9 20.0 14.3 51.4 0 Xue 2006[6]
Han (Harbin, Heilongjiang) Sinitic 35 14.3 0 0 5.7 2.9 8.6 65.7 0 J=2.9 Xue 2006[6]
Han (Lanzhou, Gansu) Sinitic 30 20.0 6.7 0 6.7 6.7 3.3 36.7 0 J=10.0
R1a1=6.7
O*(xO1a,O2,O3)=3.3
Xue 2006[6]
Han (Yili, Xinjiang) Sinitic 32 6.3 3.1 9.4 0 9.4 12.5 46.9 -- R1a1=6.3
P(xR1a1)=3.1
Y(xA,C,DE,J,K)=2.9
Xue 2006[6]
Han (Taiwan) Sinitic 183 6.3 0.3 -- 22.4 8.5 58.2 1.1 Tsai 2001[9]
Taiwanese aborigines Austronesian 246 0.4 0 0 0 66.3 10.6 11.0 -- Capelli 2001[10]
Hani (China) Tibeto-Burman 34 17.6 0 0 11.8 0 50.0 17.6 0 Y(xA,C,DE,J,K)=2.9 Xue 2006[6]
Hezhe (China) Tungusic 45 28.9 0 0 17.8 0 6.7 44.4 0 NO(xN1,O)=2.2 Xue 2006[6]
Hmong–Mien (China) Hmong–Mien 169 8.9 3.6 0 1.2 3.6 22.5 61.5 0 Karafet 2005[4]
Northeast India Tibeto-Burman 173 0.6 1.2 -- -- -- -- 86.7 0 H1=2.9, J2=0.6
O(xO3)=3.5
P=2.9
K(xL,O,P)=1.7
Cordaux 2004[11]
East Indonesia Austronesian, Papuan 344 61.9 0 10.5 -- 2.6 -- 7.3 -- S=11, M=4 Mona 2009[12]
Japan Japonic 118 5.1 46.6 -- -- -- -- -- -- P=1.7 Karafet 1999[13]
Japan Japonic 259 8.5 34.7 0 1.6 0 31.7 20.1 0.4 NO=2.3 Hammer 2005[14]
Japan (Kantō) Japonic 137 3.6 48.2 0 0 2.2 30.7 14.5 0.7 Nonaka 2007[15]
Western Japan Japonic 97 7.2 26.8 -- -- 4.1 37.1 23.9 0 Nonaka 2007[15]
Java Austronesian 53 1.9 0 1.9 0 22.6 41.5 22.6 -- R1=3.8 Kayser 2002[5]
Khalkh Mongolic 85 56.5 3.5 -- -- 0 0 18.8 -- J=2.4, N1c=4.7
P(xR1a1)=4.7
R1a1=3.5
K(xN1c,O,P)=3.5
F(xJ,K)=2.4
Katoh 2004[16]
Korea Korean 317 9.1 4.0 -- 4.1 30.3 44.5 0.6 Shin 2001[17]
Korea Korean 110 15.5 0 -- 5.5 2.7 28.2 45.5 -- K(xNO)=1.8 Kim 2007[18]
Koreans (China) Korean 25 12.0 0 4.0 4.0 0 32.0 40.0 0 BT(xC,DE,J,K)=8.0 Xue 2006[6]
Koreans (Korea) Korean 43 16.3 2.3 2.3 -- 0 30.2 39.5 -- P(xR1a1)=2.3
J=2.3
Xue 2006[6]
Koreans (Seoul-Gyeonggi) Korean 110 13.6 0.9 -- 1.8 0.9 28.2 50.9 2.7 L=0.9 Kim 2011[19]
Koreans (Gangwon[disambiguation needed]) Korean 63 12.7 -- -- 6.4 1.6 39.7 38.1 1.6 Kim 2011[19]
Koreans (Chungcheong) Korean 72 11.1 1.4 -- 4.2 1.4 30.6 50 1.4 Kim 2011[19]
Koreans (Jeolla) Korean 90 13.3 3.3 -- 4.4 1.1 33.3 43.3 -- L=1.1 Kim 2011[19]
Koreans (Gyeongsang) Korean 84 16.7 2.4 -- 4.8 2.4 33.3 36.9 1.2 L=1.2
R=1.2
Kim 2011[19]
Koreans (Jeju) Korean 87 8.1 1.2 -- 6.9 5.8 32.2 43.7 1.2 R=1.2 Kim 2011[19]
Lhoba Tibeto-Burman 0 20.8 0 34.6 -- -- 33.8 0.8 J=0.8, R=7.7
O(xO3)=1.5
Insular Southeast Asia Austronesian 312 15.7 -- 24.4 -- 23.7 14.1 18.6 -- M1=5.4 Capelli 2001[10]
Insular Southeast Asia Austronesian, Papuan 272 9.9 -- 8.8 -- 20.2 18.7 22.1 -- S=4, M=3 Kayser 2006[20]
Malaysia Austronesian 50 6 -- 8 -- 8 32 30 -- F=6, M=2 Scheinfeldt 2006[7]
Manchu Sinitic, Tungusic 101 16.8 -- 2.0 -- 3.0 33.7 42.6 -- O*(xO1,O2b,O3)
=1.0, P*(xR1a)=1.0
Katoh 2004[16]
Manchu Sinitic, Tungusic 35 25.7 2.9 2.9 14.3 2.9 14.3 37.1 0 Xue 2006[6]
Mongolia Mongolic 65 53.0 1.5 1.5 10.6 0 1.5 10.6 4.5 R1a=9.1 Xue 2006[6]
Inner Mongolia Mongolic, Sinitic 45 46.7 0 4.4 13.3 0 2.2 28.9 0 Xue 2006[6]
Oroqen Tungusic 31 61.3 0 3.2 6.5 -- 6.5 19.4 0 O(xO1a,O2,O3)=3.2 Xue 2006[6]
Qiang Tibeto-Burman 33 0 18.2 0 0 15.2 15.2 36.4 -- BT(xC,DE,J,K)=9.1
P(xR1a1)=6.1
Xue 2006[6]
Sibe Tungusic 41 26.8 2.4 4.9 17.1 7.3 2.4 26.8 -- J=7.3
P(xR1a1)=2.4
BT(xC,DE,J,K)=2.4
Xue 2006[6]
Sumatra Austronesian 57 5.3 1.8 3.5 0 17.5 14.0 29.8 -- F=14,S=3 Kayser 2006[20]
Han (Taiwan) Sinitic 183 6.3 0.3 -- 22.4 8.5 58.2 1.1 Tsai 2001[9]
Taiwanese aborigines Austronesian 246 0.4 0 0 0 66.3 10.6 11.0 -- Capelli 2001[10]
Thai Tai–Kadai 34 2.9 2.9 0 0 8.8 -- 35.3 -- O*=44.1 Tajima 2004[2]
Tibet Tibeto-Burman 156 2.6 51.6 0 4.5 0 0 33.9 3.2 H=1.9, R1a=1.9 Gayden 2007[21]
Tibetans (Lhasa, Tibet) Tibeto-Burman 46 8.7 41.3 0 0 0 2.2 39.1 -- F=4.3, P=4.3 Wen 2004[1]
Tibetans (Zhongdian, Yunnan) Tibeto-Burman 50 4.0 36.0 12.0 -- 0 4.0 44.0 0 Wen 2004[22]
Tibetans (Yushu[disambiguation needed], Qinghai) Tibeto-Burman 92 14.1 22.8 21.7 -- 1.1 -- 19.6 -- F=14.1, P=6.5 Wen 2004[1]
Tibetans (Guide, Qinghai) Tibeto-Burman 39 2.6 48.7 -- -- 7.7 0 10.3 -- F(xJ,K)=5.1
J=5.1, R1a1=2.6
P(xR1a1)=2.6
Zhou 2008[23]
Tibetans Tibeto-Burman 35 0 42.9 0 8.6 0 0 40.0 0 R1a1=8.6 Xue 2006[6]
Tibeto-Burman Tibeto-Burman 964 8.4 18.5 17.7 -- 3.1 6.3 38.7 -- F=5.4 Wen 2004[1]
Tujia (Hunan) Tibeto-Burman 155 15.5 1.3 12.9 -- 9.7 3.9 53.5 -- P=1.9 Wen 2004[1]
Uyghur Turkic 70 7.1 1.4 7.1 8.6 1.4 0 11.4 -- others=63 Xue 2006[6]
Vietnam Austroasiatic 70 4.3 2.9 0 2.9 5.7 32.9 40.0 7.1 J=2.9 Karafet 2005[4]
Yao (Bama, Guangxi) Hmong–Mien 35 17.1 2.9 0 -- 2.9 40.0 34.3 0 NO(xN1,O)=2.9 Xue 2006[6]
Yao (Liannan, Guangdong) Hmong–Mien 35 2.9 0 0 0 5.7 8.6 82.9 0 Xue 2006[6]
Yi (Sichuan, Yunnan) Tibeto-Burman 125 5.6 0.8 28.0 -- 0.8 7.2 28.8 -- F=18 Wen 2004[1]
Zakhchin Mongolic 60 46.7 3.3 -- N1c=
3.3
0 O2b=
3.3
8.3 -- R1a1=13.3
O(xO1a,O2b,O3)
=8.3, J=1.7
P(xR1a1)=5.0
K(xN1c,O,P)=5.0
F(xJ,K)=1.7
Katoh 2004[16]

Principal Groups[edit]

Population Language n C D K N O1 O2 O3 Q Others Reference
Han (China) Sinitic 166 6.0 0.6 1.2 9.0 9.6 16.3 55.4 0.6 Karafet 2005[4]
Japan Japonic 259 8.5 34.7 0 1.6 0 31.7 20.1 0.4 NO=2.3 Hammer 2005[14]
South Korea Korean 506 12.6 1.6 0 4.5 2.2 32.4 44.3 1.4 L=0.6, R=0.4 Kim 2011[19]

Malaysia

Austronesian 50 6 -- 8 0 8 32 30 -- F=6, M=2 Scheinfeldt 2006[7]
Mongolia Mongolic 65 53.0 1.5 1.5 10.6 0 1.5 10.6 4.5 R1a=9.1 Xue 2006[6]
Thai Tai–Kadai 34 2.9 2.9 0 0 8.8 -- 35.3 -- O(xO1,O3)=44.1 Tajima 2004[2]
Tibet (Lhasa) Tibeto-Burman 46 8.7 41.3 0 0 0 2.2 39.1 -- F=4.3, P=4.3 Wen 2004[1]
Uyghur Turkic 70 7.1 1.4 7.1 8.6 1.4 0 11.4 -- others=63 Xue 2006[6]
Vietnam Austroasiatic 70 4.3 2.9 0 2.9 5.7 32.9 40.0 7.1 J=2.9 Karafet 2005[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Bo Wen 2004, Analyses of Genetic Structure of Tibeto-Burman Populations Reveals Sex-Biased Admixture in Southern Tibeto-Burmans
  2. ^ a b c d Atsushi Tajima et al. (March 2, 2004). "Genetic origins of the Ainu inferred from combined DNA analyses of maternal and paternal lineages". Journal of Human Genetics 49 (4): 187–193. doi:10.1007/s10038-004-0131-x. OCLC 110247689. PMID 14997363. 
  3. ^ Kumarasamy Thangaraj et al 2002, Genetic Affinities of the Andaman Islanders, a Vanishing Human Population
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Tatiana M. Karafet 2005, Balinese Y-chromosome perspective on the peopling of Indonesia: genetic contributions from pre-neolithic hunter-gatherers, Austronesian farmers, and Indian traders
  5. ^ a b Manfred Kayser et al 2002-2003, Reduced Y-Chromosome, but Not Mitochondrial DNA, Diversity in Human Populations from West New Guinea
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Yali Xue et al 2006, Male demography in East Asia: a north-south contrast in human population expansion times
  7. ^ a b c Laura Scheinfeldt, Françoise Friedlaender, Jonathan Friedlaender, Krista Latham, George Koki, Tatyana Karafet, Michael Hammer and Joseph Lorenz, "Unexpected NRY Chromosome Variation in Northern Island Melanesia," Molecular Biology and Evolution 2006 23(8):1628-1641
  8. ^ B. Mohan Reddy 2007, Austro-Asiatic Tribes of Northeast India Provide Hitherto Missing Genetic Link between South and Southeast Asia
  9. ^ a b Li-Chin Tsai 2001, Haplotype frequencies of nine Y-chromosome STR loci in the Taiwanese Han population
  10. ^ a b c Cristian Capelli et al 2001, A Predominantly Indigenous Paternal Heritage for the Austronesian-Speaking Peoples of Insular Southeast Asia and Oceania
  11. ^ Richard Cordaux et al 2004, The Northeast Indian Passageway: A Barrier or Corridor for Human Migrations?
  12. ^ Stefano Mona et al 2009, Genetic Admixture History of Eastern Indonesia as Revealed by Y-Chromosome and Mitochondrial DNA Analysis
  13. ^ T. M. Karafet, S. L. Zegura, O. Posukh et al., "Ancestral Asian Source(s) of New World Y-Chromosome Founder Haplotypes," American Journal of Human Genetics 64 : 817–831, 1999
  14. ^ a b Michael F. Hammer et al 2005, Dual origins of the Japanese: common ground for hunter-gatherer and farmer Y chromosomes
  15. ^ a b I. Nonaka et al 2007, Y-chromosomal Binary Haplogroups in the Japanese Population and their Relationship to 16 Y-STR Polymorphisms
  16. ^ a b c Toru Katoh 2004, Genetic features of Mongolian ethnic groups revealed by Y-chromosomal analysis
  17. ^ Dong-Jik Shin et al 2001, Y-Chromosome multiplexes and their potential for the DNA profiling of Koreans
  18. ^ Wook Kim 2007, Lack of Association between Y-Chromosomal Haplogroups and Prostate Cancer in the Korean Population
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Soon-Hee Kim 2011, High frequencies of Y-chromosome haplogroup O2b-SRY465 lineages in Korea: a genetic perspective on the peopling of Korea
  20. ^ a b Manfred Kayser et al 2006, Melanesian and Asian Origins of Polynesians: mtDNA and Y Chromosome Gradients Across the Pacific
  21. ^ Tenzin Gayden et al 2007, The Himalayas as a Directional Barrier to Gene Flow
  22. ^ Bo Wen, Hong Shi, Ling Ren et al., "The origin of Mosuo people as revealed by mtDNA and Y chromosome variation," Science in China Ser. C Life Sciences 2004 Vol.47 No.1 1-10
  23. ^ Ruixia Zhou 2008, Origin and evolution of two Yugur sub-clans in Northwest China: a case study in paternal genetic landscape

External links[edit]