Y-DNA haplogroups by populations of Near East

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Listed here are notable ethnic groups and populations from Western Asia, North Africa and South Caucasus by human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups based on relevant studies. The samples are taken from individuals identified with the ethnic and linguistic designations in the first two columns, the third column gives the sample size studied, and the other columns give the percentage of the particular haplogroup. (IE = Indo-European, AA = Afro-Asiatic)

Population Language n E1b1a E1b1b G I  J L N R1a R1b T Reference
Arabs (Algeria) AA (Semitic) 35 54 35 0.0 13.0 Arredi2004[1]
Arabs (Algeria - Oran) AA (Semitic) 102 12.8 50.9 27.4 1 10.8 Robino2008[2]
Arabs (Bedouin) AA (Semitic) 32 18.7 6.3 65.6 0.0 9.4 0.0 Nebel2001[3]
Arabs (Egyptians) AA (Semitic) 147 2.8 36.7 8.8 0.7 32.0 0.0 2.7 4.1 8.2 Luis2004[4]
Arabs (Iraq) AA (Semitic) 0.9 8.3 50.6 Semino2004[5]
Arabs (Israel) AA (Semitic) 143 20.3 6.3 55.2 0.0 1.4 8.4 Nebel2001[3]
Arabs (Jordan) AA (Semitic) 146 0 26.0 4.1 3.4 43.8 0 0 1.4 17.8 0 AbuAmero2009[6]
Arabs (Lebanon) AA (Semitic) 31 25.8 3.2 3.2 45.2 3.2 0.0 9.7 6.4 0.0 Semino2000[7]
Arabs (Libya) AA (Semitic) 63 0.0 52.0 8.0 1.5 24.0 1.5 1.5 3 5.0 Immel2006[8]
Arabs (Morocco) AA (Semitic) 44 0.0 0.0 3.8 Pericic2005[9]
Arabs (Morocco) AA (Semitic) 49 75.5 20.4 Semino2004[5]
Arabs (Oman) AA (Semitic) 121 7.4 15.7 1.7 0.0 47.9 0.8 9.1 1.7 8.3 Luis2004[4]
Arabs (Qatar) AA (Semitic) 72 2.8 5.6 2.8 0.0 66.7 2.8 0.0 6.9 1.4 0.0 Cadenas2008[10]
Arabs (Saudi Arabia) AA (Semitic) 157 7.6 7.6 3.2 0.0 58.0 1.9 0.0 5.1 1.9 5.1 AbuAmero2009[6]
Arabs (Syria) AA (Semitic) 20 10.0 0.0 5.0 30.0 0.0 0.0 10.0 15.0 0.0 Semino2000[7]
Arabs (Sudan) AA (Semitic) 102 16.7 3.9 47.1 15.7 Hassan2008[11]
Arabs (Tunisia) AA (Semitic) 148 1.4 49.3 0.0 35.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.8 0.7 Arredi2004[1]
Arabs (UAE) AA (Semitic) 164 5.5 11.6 4.3 45.1 3.0 0.0 7.3 4.3 4.9 Cadenas2008[10]
Arabs (Yemen) AA (Semitic) 62 3.2 12.9 1.6 0.0 82.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Cadenas2008[10]
Armenians IE (Armenian) 89 3.4 29.2 3.4 5.6 24.7 Rosser2000[12]
Armenians IE (Armenian) 100 6 11 5 24 6 19 Nasidze2004[13]
Armenians IE (Armenian) 734 5.4 1.6 5.3 32.4 Weale2001[14]
Ashkenazi Jews AA (Semitic) 79 22.8 43.0 0.0 12.7 Nebel2001[3]
Ashkenazi Jews AA (Semitic) 442 0.2 19.7 9.7 4.1 38.0 0.2 0.2 Behar2004[15]
Assyrians (Iran) AA (Semitic) 48 0 4.2 8.3 0 29.2 0 0 8.3 29.2 8.3 Grugni 2012[16]
Azerbaijanis Altaic (Turkic) 72 6 18 3 31 7 11 Nasidze2004[13]
Azerbaijanis Altaic (Turkic) 97 4.1 Cruciani2004[17]
Baloch IE (Iranian, NW) 25 0.0 8.0 0.0 0.0 16.0 24.0 0.0 28.0 8.0 0.0 Sengupta2006[18]
Berbers (Moyen Atlas) AA (Berber) 69 87.1 Cruciani2004[17]
Berbers (Marrakesh) AA (Berber) 29 92.9 Cruciani2004[17]
Berbers (Mozabite) AA (Berber) 20 80.0 Cruciani2004[17]
Berbers (Morocco) AA (Berber) 64 4.7 79.6 6.3 Semino2004[5]
Berbers (north-central Morocco) AA (Berber) 63 9.5 74.6 0 3.2 0 0 0 Bosch2001[19]
Berbers (southern Morocco) AA (Berber) 40 2.5 85 0 2.5 0 0 0 Bosch2001[19]
Copts (Sudan) AA (Ancient Egyptian) 33 21.2 45.5 15.2 Hassan2008[11]
Cypriots IE (Greek) 45 27.0 2.0 9.0 Rosser2000[12]
Druze AA (Semitic) 28 14.3 Cruciani2004[17]
Egyptians AA (Semitic) 92 3.3 43.5 2.2 1.1 22.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.4 7.6 Wood2005[20]
Egyptians AA (Semitic) 147 2 36 9 1 31 3 2 8 AbuAmero2009[6]
Egyptians (North) AA (Semitic) 43 53.5 7.0 0.0 18.2 0.0 2.3 9.3 2.3 Zalloua2008[21]
Egyptians (South) AA (Semitic) 29 31.0 17.2 3.4 24.1 0.0 0.0 13.8 10.3 Zalloua2008[21]
Georgians Caucasian (South) 63 30.1 0.0 36.5 1.6 7.9 14.3 1.6 Semino2000[7]
Georgians Caucasian (South) 66 0.0 3.0 31.8 1.5 36.4 1.5 0.0 10.6 9.1 1.5 Battaglia2008[22]
Iranians (North Iran) IE (Iranian, West) 33 0.0 0.0 15.2 0.0 33.3 3.0 6.1 6.1 15.2 0.0 Regueiro2006[23]
Iranians (South Iran) IE (Iranian, West) 117 1.7 5.1 12.8 0.0 35.0 6.0 0.9 16.2 6.0 3.4 Regueiro2006[23]
Iranians IE (Iranian, West) 130 4.6 5.4 24.6 13.8 19.2 4.6 Nasidze2004[13]
Iranians IE 938 1.8 7.0 11.7 0.5 31.4 5.0 0.1 14.3 10.1 3.4 Grugni 2012[16]
Iraq 203 1.0 10.8 2.5 0.5 57.6 1.0 1.0 6.9 10.8 5.9 Abu A. 2009[6]
Kurdish Jews AA (Semitic) 95 12.1 37.4 1.0 4.0 20.2 Nebel2001[3]
Kurds (Muslim)(Northern Iraq) IE (Iranian, NW) 95 7.4 4.2 16.8 40.0 3.2 11.6 16.8 Nebel2001[3]
Lebanon 916 0.7 16.2 6.5 4.8 46.0 5.2 0 2.5 8.1 4.7 AbuAmero2009[6]
Nubians (Sudan) Nilo-Saharan (Eastern Sudanic) 39 0.0 23.1 5.1 43.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 10.3 0.0 Hassan2008[11]
Saharawish (Morocco) AA (Semitic) 29 3.4 79.3 17.2 Semino2004[5]
Sephardic Jews AA (Semitic) 78 19.2 11.5 28.2 0.0 3.9 29.5 Nebel2001[3]
Soqotra AA (Semitic) 63 E=9 85.7 1.6 0 Cerny2009[24]
Turks Altaic (Turkic) 523 0.2 11.3 10.9 5.4 J1=9.0
J2=24.3
4.2 3.8 6.9 16.1 2.5 Cinnioglu2004[25]
Turks Altaic (Turkic) 741 5.1 Rootsi2004[26]
Turks Altaic (Turkic) 167 10.2 32.9 2.4 4.8 20.4 Rosser2000[12]
Turks Altaic (Turkic) 59 13.6 8.5 6.8 30.5 0.0 11.9 20.3 1.7 Sanchez2005[27]
Turks (Central Anatolia) Altaic (Turkic) 61 6.6 Pericic2005[9]
Turks (Istanbul) Altaic (Turkic) 13.0 24.7 Semino2004[5]
Turks (Konya) Altaic (Turkic) 14.5 31.8 Semino2004[5]
Turks (Cypriot) Altaic (Turkic) 46 13.0 Cruciani2004[17]
Turks (Southeastern) Altaic (Turkic) 24 4.2 Cruciani2004[17]
Turks (Erzurum) Altaic (Turkic) 25 4.0 Cruciani2004[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]