Yadkinville, North Carolina

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Yadkinville, North Carolina
Town
Motto: "A Town in Progress"
Location of Yadkinville, North Carolina
Location of Yadkinville, North Carolina
Coordinates: 36°7′58″N 80°39′39″W / 36.13278°N 80.66083°W / 36.13278; -80.66083Coordinates: 36°7′58″N 80°39′39″W / 36.13278°N 80.66083°W / 36.13278; -80.66083
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Yadkin
Area
 • Total 2.7 sq mi (7.1 km2)
 • Land 2.7 sq mi (7.1 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 974 ft (297 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 2,959
 • Density 1,087.9/sq mi (416.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 27055
Area code(s) 336
FIPS code 37-75960[1]
GNIS feature ID 0997683[2]
Website http://www.yadkinville.org/

Yadkinville is a town in Yadkin County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 2,818 at the 2000 census. Located in the Piedmont Triad, it is the county seat and largest city of Yadkin County.[3]

Geography[edit]

Yadkinville is located at 36°07′58″N 80°39′39″W / 36.132700°N 80.660872°W / 36.132700; -80.660872.[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2), all of it land. Yadkinville is known locally for its "Harvest Festival" and "Grape Festival," which honors the Yadkin Valley Vineyards and as well as other vineyards around the state and VA.

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 2,818 people, 959 households, and 641 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,034.2 people per square mile (400.0/km2). There were 1,026 housing units at an average density of 376.5 per square mile (145.6/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 85.84% White, 6.53% African American, 0.04% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 6.32% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.81% of the population.

There were 959 households out of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the town the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 21.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $31,250, and the median income for a family was $45,000. Males had a median income of $25,172 versus $25,273 for females. The per capita income for the town was $14,792. About 10.6% of families and 14.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.1% of those under age 18 and 13.9% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

The area was chosen as the county seat with the founding of Yadkin County in 1850. It was first known as Wilson, in honor of Louis D. Wilson, a legislator who died in the Mexican War. However, the name was changed to Yadkinville in 1852 after it was discovered that another area, Wilson, North Carolina, already had the name. At the time the county seat was established, there was only one house in town.[5] Yadkinville was incorporated in 1857.

The first courthouse, a two-story brick building, was built in 1853 by William White of Hamptonville, North Carolina. The bricks were handmade on a farm north of town. The courthouse was torn down in 1958 and a new building was constructed.

Notable people[edit]

  • Mo Cowan, United States Senator from Massachusetts[6]
  • Nathan Harris, subject of the 2011 Afghanistan War documentary Hell and Back Again
  • Freddie Lotion, Adult Film Star and Web Authour, Retired 2008

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ An Illustrated History of Yadkin County, 1850-1980, W.E. Rutledge Jr., Page 52
  6. ^ 'For top aide, echoes of governor's journey,' Boston Globe, Michael Levenson, December 13, 2010

External links[edit]