Yakovlev Yak-10

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Yak-10 (Як-10)
Role Utility aircraft
National origin Soviet Union
Manufacturer Yakovlev
First flight 1944[1]
Number built 40+
Developed from Yakovlev AIR-6

The Yakovlev Yak-10 was a Soviet light liaison aircraft designed and built by the Yakovlev design bureau in the 1940s.[2][1]

Design and development[edit]

In the late 1940s the Soviet forces had a need for a light liaison aircraft that was smaller than the Antonov An-2.[2] The company derived two four-seat aircraft with wooden wings and metal fuselages, from the earlier AIR-6.[1] The Yak-10, a high-wing strut-braced monoplane with fixed landing gear and the Yak-13 a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a manually retractable landing gear.[2] Both aircraft were powered by a 145hp M-11MF radial engine.[2] After tests in 1945, despite unimpressive performance, the Yak-10 was awarded a production contract for 40 aircraft.[2] The company built a number of different variants but soon produced an improved design, the Yak-12, which although of similar layout, was not a derivative of the Yak-10.[2]

The Yak-10 only entered limited production before it was replaced by the superior Yakovlev Yak-12, and although the Yak-13 proved to be superior to the original Yak-10, production was not carried out.[2][1]

Variants[edit]

Yak-10
Strut-braced high-wing monoplane powered by a Shvetsov M-11MF radial engine.[2]
Yak-10G
Floatplane variant with twin floats.[2]
Yak-10S
Ambulance variant with room for one stretcher.[2]
Yak-10V
Dual control.[1]
Yak-13
Low-wing monoplane derivative, using an almost identical fuselage and Shvetsov M-11MF engine installation, with a cantilevered wooden low wing for direct comparison with the Yak-10. One built.[2][3]

Specifications (Yak-10)[edit]

Data from [1]The Osprey Encyclopaedia of Russian Aircraft 1875 – 1995

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 3 passengers
  • Length: 8.45 m (27 ft 8⅝ in)
  • Wingspan: 12.0 m (39 ft 4½ in)
  • Wing area: 22.0 m2 (237 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 820 kg (1,808 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,250 kg (2,756 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Shvetsov M-11FR radial engine, 119 kW (160 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 206 km/h (128 mph)
  • Range: 605 km (376 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 3,500 m (11,480 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 3.0[4] m/s (600 ft/min)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gunston 1995, pp. 468-469
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Vaclav 1986, p. 303
  3. ^ Gunston 1995, p. 472
  4. ^ 5.5 min to 1,000 m (3,300 ft)

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gunston, Bill (1995). The Osprey Encyclopedia of Russian Aircraft from 1875 - 1995. London: Osprey Aerospace. ISBN 1-85532-405-9. 
  • Nemecek, Vaclav (1986). The History of Soviet Aircraft from 1918. London: Willow Books. ISBN 0-00-218033-2.