Yale, Iowa

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Yale, Iowa
City
Location of Yale, Iowa
Location of Yale, Iowa
Coordinates: 41°46′31″N 94°21′20″W / 41.77528°N 94.35556°W / 41.77528; -94.35556Coordinates: 41°46′31″N 94°21′20″W / 41.77528°N 94.35556°W / 41.77528; -94.35556
Country  United States
State  Iowa
County Guthrie
Incorporated November 27, 1901[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.27 sq mi (0.71 km2)
 • Land 0.27 sq mi (0.71 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,122 ft (342 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 246
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 243
 • Density 901.1/sq mi (347.9/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 50277
Area code(s) 641
FIPS code 19-87285
GNIS feature ID 0463232

Yale is a city in Guthrie County, Iowa, United States. The population was 246 in the 2010 census, a decline from 287 in 2000 census.[5] It is part of the Des MoinesWest Des Moines Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Yale was platted in 1882. It was named for its founder, Milo Yale.[6]

Geography[edit]

Yale is located at 41°46′31″N 94°21′20″W / 41.77528°N 94.35556°W / 41.77528; -94.35556 (41.775323, -94.355576).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.27 square miles (0.70 km2), all of it land.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Yale Historical Populations
Census Pop.
1910 273
1920 276 1.1%
1930 304 10.1%
1940 287 −5.6%
1950 293 2.1%
1960 260 −11.3%
1970 301 15.8%
1980 299 −0.7%
1990 220 −26.4%
2000 287 30.5%
2010 246 −14.3%
Iowa Data Center [5]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 246 people, 113 households, and 68 families residing in the city. The population density was 901.1 inhabitants per square mile (347.9 /km2). There were 129 housing units at an average density of 472.5 per square mile (182.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.8% White, 0.4% African American, 0.4% Native American, and 0.4% from two or more races.

There were 113 households of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.8% were non-families. 38.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 22.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.18 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the city was 45 years. 25.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.4% were from 25 to 44; 25.2% were from 45 to 64; and 24.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 45.9% male and 54.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 287 people, 125 households, and 75 families residing in the city. The population density was 969.8 people per square mile (369.4/km²). There were 130 housing units at an average density of 439.3 per square mile (167.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 99.65% White, and 0.35% from two or more races.

There were 125 households out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.2% were non-families. 35.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 90.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,875, and the median income for a family was $36,806. Males had a median income of $29,375 versus $17,813 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,789. About 9.1% of families and 11.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.2% of those under the age of eighteen and 13.3% of those sixty five or over.

Arts and culture[edit]

Festivals[edit]

Annually, Yale hosts a Fourth of July festival, which includes a street dance or a local band that plays at the Yale Community Club on the night of the Third of July. On the Fourth of July the town parade kicks off the events starting at 11:00 a.m. Throughout the day in Yale on the Fourth of July there are many family friendly events going on. The Yale Saddle Club puts on a horse show on the south end of town near the park. In the vacant lot south of old round gym and directly east of the baseball field Yale puts on a garden tractor contest. Throughout the day most events are held on main street to include street venders, a car show, a talent show, bingo, and many others. To close the day's events when it gets dark enough in the evening the Farmers State Bank and the City of Yale sponsor a fireworks display. Yale's population doubles if not triples during the day of the Fourth of July.[9]

Business[edit]

Yale has Just Ethel's Bar and Grill, the Bell Street Market, Smith Tire, Farmer's State Bank, Kipp Farms, and the Farmer's Coop. Most of the businesses are centrally located on main street.

Culture[edit]

The residents of Yale are known for having well-groomed yards. The Yale Gardening Club puts on an annual contest for Yale Yard Of the Month running from May to September. Winners of yard of the month win twenty-five dollars for getting Yale Yard of the Month. Yale is a farm-based community, with a majority of the residents commuting to and from work to other surrounding communities. Yale is a type of town where everyone knows each other as well as looks out for one another.

Government[edit]

Steve Stanton was reelected to the Mayor of Yale in 2011 until 2016.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yale-Iowa". City-Data. Retrieved March 19, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-05-11. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-23. 
  5. ^ a b "Data from the 2010 Census". State Data Center of Iowa. Retrieved March 19, 2011. 
  6. ^ History of Guthrie and Adair Counties, Iowa. Continental Historical Company. 1884. p. 507. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ Fourth of July in Yale website
  10. ^ http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=20385527&BRD=2020&PAG=461&dept_id=231738&rfi=8 Low Turnout for City Elections Guthrie Center Times retrieved on February 19, 2010

External links[edit]

  • City-Data Comprehensive Statistical Data and more about Yale