Yarn weight

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Yarn weight refers to the thickness of yarn used by knitters, weavers, crocheters and other fiber artists. Changing yarn weight or needle size can have a significant impact on the finished project, so standardized systems have been spread about, as well as conversion systems for regional standards (especially needle sizes[1]).Yarn weight is important in achieving the correct gauge or tension for a particular project and can help with yarn substitution. The Craft Yarn Council of America has developed a system that seeks to standardize the labeled weights of yarn.[2] Most yarns state their weight on the ball band. Some brands use a standardized numbering system that uses 7 ranges of relative thickness of yarn.

One way of determining the weight of an unknown yarn is to use the wrapping method.

Wrap the yarn around a large needle or a ruler. Make sure the yarn lies flat. Push the yarn together so there are no gaps between wraps. Smooth it out so it is neither too loose nor too tight. Measure the number of wraps per inch (2.5 cm). For better accuracy, measure the wraps at the centre of your yarn sample.

Standard Yarn Weight System Nm (length per mass, SI (International System of Units)) Yarn Type (US) Ply (UK, NZ, AU)[3] m/100g Wraps Per Inch (WPI)[3] needles / circulars recommended, mm
0 or Lace 6 - 8 Thread, Cobweb and Lace 1 - 3 ply 600-800 18+ wpi 1.5 - 2.5
1 or Superfine 4 - 6 Fingering, Sock 4 ply 400-480 14 wpi 2 - 3
2 or Fine 3 - 4 Sport 5 ply 300-400 12 wpi 3 - 4
3 or Light 2.4 - 3 DK 8 ply 240-300 11 wpi 4 - 4.5
4 or Medium 1.2 - 2.4 Worsted 10 ply 120-240 9 wpi 4.5 - 5.5
5 or Bulky 1 - 1.3 Bulky 12 ply 100-130 7 wpi 5.5 - 8
6 or Super Bulky >1 Super Bulky Less than 100 5-6 wpi >8

Different terminology is used in different countries:

USA UK Australia Suggested needle (mm)
Laceweight 1 ply 2 ply 1.5–2.25 mm
Fingering 2 ply 3 ply 2.25– 3 mm
Sock 3 ply 3 ply 2.25— 3.25 mm
Sport 4 ply 5 ply 3.25— 3.75 mm
DK/Light Worsted DK 8 ply 3.75— 4.5 mm
Worsted Aran 10 ply 4.5— 5.5 mm
Bulky Chunky 12 ply 5.5– 8 mm
Super Bulky Super Chunky 14 ply 8 mm and up

Fabric[edit]

The following equation may be used to determine the weight of warp and weft required for a particular fabric:

  • Weight of warp = (0.65 x qty. of fabric (metres) x no. of warp ends) / count

If there are two colors in the warp, use the following equations:

  • Weight of color A (kg) = (0.65 x qty. of fabric (metres) x no. of warp ends of color A) / count of color A
  • Weight of color B (kg) = (0.65 x Qty. of fabric (metres) x no. of warp ends of color B) / count of color B

If the counts of two warps are the same:

  • Weight of color A (kg) = (total weight of warp reqd. x no. of ends of color A) / total no. of warp ends
  • Weight of color B (kg) = (total weight of warp reqd. x no. of ends of color B) / total no. of warp ends

or

  • Weight of color (B) = total weight of warp reqd. - weight of color A
  • Weight of weft = (0.6 x qty. of fabric (metres) x PPI x reed space) / count

If there are two colors in the weft:

  • Weight of color A (kg) = (0.6 x qty. of fabric (metres) x PPI of color A x reed space) / count of color A
  • Weight of color B (kg) = (0.6 x qty. of fabric (metres) x PPI of color B x reed space) / count of color B

or

  • Weight of color (B) = total weight of weft reqd. - weight of color A
  • Another formula
  1. Reed x width / 7000 = Ans
  2. Ans x quantity (mtr) / count = The weight required(Kg)

See also[edit]

References[edit]