Yasuo Ōtsuka

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Yasuo Ōtsuka
Born (1931-07-11) July 11, 1931 (age 83)[1]
Shimane Prefecture, Japan
Occupation Animator and character designer

Yasuo Ōtsuka (大塚康生 Ōtsuka Yasuo?, born July 11, 1931) is a Japanese animator who worked with Toei Animation and Studio Ghibli.[2]

Biography[edit]

Ōtsuka was born in Shimane Prefecture. During a visit to Tsuwano at the age of 10, he saw a steam locomotive for the first time. He began to take an interest in Locamotives and their operation and would frequently sketch them.[3] In 1945 his family moved to Yamaguchi Prefecture where there was a military base. He began to draw the array of military vehicles located there while also drawing a variety of subjects in different styles. Otsuka also collected cuttings of cartoon strips into scrapbooks to lean more about drawing styles.[4] Otsuka later joined the Yamaguchi's Beurau of Statistics but wanted to become a political cartoonist in Tokyo. However at the time, permission was needed to move to Tokyo so he applied to the Health and Welfare Ministry. After passing the exam he was assigned to the drug enforcement division as an assistant who maintained the firearms of the agents.[5] Around this time he suffered from Tuberculosis.[6]

In July 2002 a exhibition of his work and personal pieces was held in Ginza.[7]

Career[edit]

During 1956 Otsuka saw an advertisement in Yomiuri Shinbun where Toei were asking for applications for animators. After passing the test Otsuka worked with Yasuji Mori and Akira Daikubara on the The Tale of the White Serpent and learnt their approaches. Wanting to learn more animation theory, he began to seek out textbooks and was shown a textbook on US animation written by Preston Blair.[8] After working on Magic Boy (film) in 1959 his animation of a skeleton was unintentionally considered comical due to its realism. This lead to comical bad guy characters becoming Otsuka's speciality. He came to believe that genuine realism doesn't suit animation and "constructed realism" is more suitable. Hayao Miyazaki compared Otsuka to Kenichi Enomoto in the use of this approach.[9][10] After completion of his next film The Wonderful World of Puss 'n Boots Otsuka left Toei to join A Production.[11]

Otsuka has written several books about the anime industry. His *Sakuga Asemamire (作画汗まみれ?) is considered "a prime resource for the history of 1960s and 1970s anime".[12]

Otsuka is currently an advisor to Telecom Animation Film.[13]

Works[edit]

1957

  • Kitten's Scribbling (こねこのらくがき Koneko no Rakugaki?)
  • New Adventures of Hanuman (ハヌマンの新しい冒険 Hanuman no Atarashii Bouken?)
  • Kappa no Pataro (かっぱのぱあ太郎?)

1958

1959

  • Tanuki-san no Ootari (たぬきさん大当り?)
  • Kuma to Kodomo-tachi (熊と子供たち?)
  • Magic Boy (film) (少年猿飛佐助 Shounen Sarutobi Sasuke?)

1960

1961

  • The Littlest Warrior (安寿と厨子王丸 Anju to Zushio-maru?)

1962

1963

  • The Little Prince and the Eight-Headed Dragon (わんぱく王子の大蛇退治 Wanpaku Ōji no Orochi Taiji?)
  • Wolf Boy Ken (狼少年ケン Ookami Shounen Ken?)

1964

  • Samurai Kid (少年忍者風のフジ丸 Shounen Ninja Kaze no Fujimaru?)

1965

1968

1969

1971

1972

  • Frog with Guts (ど根性ガエル Dokonjou Gaeru?)
  • Panda! Go, Panda! (パンダ・コパンダ Panda go Panda?)

1973

1975

  • Adventures of Gamba (ガンバの冒險 Ganba no Bouken?)

1976

1977

  • Tenguri, Boy of the Plains (草原の子テングリ Sougen no Ko Tenguri?)
  • My Name Is Teppei (おれは鉄兵 Ore wa Teppei?)

1978

1979

1980

1981

  • Chie the Brat (じゃリン子チエ Jarinko Chie?)
  • Kao Expert Theatre (花王名人劇場 Kaō Meijin Gekijō?)

1984

1987

1989

  • Little Nemo (リトル・ニモ Ritoru Nimo?)

1990

1995

2006

2007

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yasuo Otsuka's Illustration Works "Lupin The Third". Futabasha. p. 4. ISBN 978-4-575-30407-7. 
  2. ^ Clements, Jonathan; McCarthy, Helen (2006). The Anime Encyclopedia: A Guide to Japanese Animation Since 1917 (Revised and Expanded edition). p. 472. ISBN 1-933330-10-4. 
  3. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 8 minutes in. 
  4. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 13 minutes in. 
  5. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 14 minutes in. 
  6. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 19 minutes in. 
  7. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 1 minutes in. 
  8. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 20 minutes in. 
  9. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 24 minutes in. 
  10. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 31 minutes in. 
  11. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 47 minutes in. 
  12. ^ Jonathan Clements. Anime A History. British Film Institute. p. 13. ISBN 978-1-84457-390-5. 
  13. ^ 大塚康生の動かす喜び [Yasuo Otsuka's Joy in Motion] (DVD) (in Japanese). Japan: Studio Ghibli. 2003. 3:50 minutes in. 

External links[edit]