Yeh, Yeh

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For other uses, see Yé-yé.
"Yeh Yeh"
Single by Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames
B-side "Preach and Teach"
Released 1964
Format 7"
Recorded 1964
Genre Rhythm and blues
Length 2:43
Label Columbia (EMI) DB 7428[1]
Writer(s) Rodgers Grant, Pat Patrick, Jon Hendricks[1]
Producer(s) Tony Palmer[1]
Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames singles chronology
"Bend a Little"
(1964)
"Yeh Yeh"
(1964)
"In the Meantime"
(1965)

"Yeh Yeh" is a Latin soul tune, that was written as an instrumental by Rodgers Grant and Pat Patrick, and first recorded by Mongo Santamaría on his 1963 album Watermelon Man. Lyrics were written for it shortly thereafter by Jon Hendricks of the vocal group Lambert, Hendricks & Ross. This version of the song was taken to the top of the UK Singles Chart in January 1965 by Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames (b/w "Preach and Teach", Columbia DB 7428), breaking The Beatles' long-term hold on the number one spot (of five weeks with "I Feel Fine"),[2] and a month later appeared on the US Billboard pop singles chart to peak at #21.[3]

Interviewed after the 2003 Jools Holland Spring Hootennany, where he had played a "dynamite version" of the song, Fame explained that the arrangement had been written by Tubby Hayes.[4]

Other notable covers include those by pop/rock duo They Might Be Giants on their Mink Car album, and Matt Bianco, who covered the song in 1985, reaching number 13 in the UK Singles Chart (the single version was then included in their second eponymous album in 1986, while the respective CD edition of the album only contained its 12" Dance Mix — both versions featured on the MC edition of the long playing work, depending upon the various countries). British actor and musician Hugh Laurie also included a live cover version of Yeh, Yeh on his album Didn't It Rain.

In 1986, Australian recording artist Kate Ceberano recorded a version for her album, Kate Ceberano and her Septet.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rice, Jo (1982). The Guinness Book of 500 Number One Hits (1st ed.). Enfield, Middlesex: Guinness Superlatives Ltd. pp. 86–7. ISBN 0-85112-250-7. 
  2. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. pp. 173–4. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  3. ^ "Official Singles Chart UK Top 100 - 5th April 2014 | The UK Charts | Top 40". Theofficialcharts.com. Retrieved 2014-04-05. 
  4. ^ John L Walters. "Jools Holland's wild Spring Hootenanny | Culture". The Guardian. Retrieved 2014-04-05. 
Preceded by
"I Feel Fine" by The Beatles
UK number-one single
14 January 1965 (2 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Go Now" by The Moody Blues