Yehoshua Rokeach

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Yehoshua Rokeach
Second Belzer Rebbe
Yehoshua Rokeach.jpg
Term 1856–1894
Full name Yehoshua Rokeach
Main work Mahar"i
Ohel Yehoshua
Born 1825
Buried Belz
Dynasty Belz
Predecessor Shalom Rokeach
Successor Yissachar Dov Rokeach
Father Shalom Rokeach
Wife 1 daughter of R' Shmuel Ashkenazi
Children 1 Shmuel of Sokal
Yissachar Dov Rokeach
Naftoli of Navry
Arye Leybush of Magrov and Rawa Ruska
Wife 2 daughter of R' Avrohom Yehoshua Heshl of Bazilia

Yehoshua Rokeach (1825 – February 3, 1894) was the second rebbe of the Belz Hasidic dynasty. He combined Torah scholarship with practical common sense to guide thousands of Hasidim and to fight the Haskalah ("Enlightenment") movement that was making inroads in Jewish communities in Poland during the nineteenth century. His pioneering activities included founding the Machzikei Hadas organization.

Family life[edit]

Yehoshua Rokeach was born in 1825. He married a granddaughter of the Apter Rov and had 5 sons and 4 daughters. His second son, Yissachar Dov, succeeded him as rebbe.

Leadership[edit]

Rokeach was at first unwilling to don the mantle of leadership after the death of his father, Rebbe Shalom Rokeach (the Sar Shalom), founder of the Belz dynasty. For two years before his death, the Sar Shalom had spent several hours each day talking with his youngest son and suggesting that he should be his successor. But after the Sar Shalom died in 1855, Yehoshua was unwilling to step ahead of his four older brothers to become rebbe. From 1855-1857, Belz Hasidut slowly crumbled without a central leader and many Hasidim defected to other rebbes. Finally, on Rosh Hashana 1857, Yehoshua decisively grasped the reigns of leadership by entering the central Belz synagogue for the prayer services and seating himself in the rebbe's chair by the eastern wall. He reigned as Rebbe from 1857 to 1894.

Under his leadership the yoshvim (learners) program of Belz expanded significantly. Belz encouraged married men to spend their days immersed in Torah study and prayer in the central Belz synagogue. Their meals and lodgings were provided by local businessmen. Some men remained in the program without returning home for months at a time.

Rokeach led his Hasidim with both deep erudition and common sense. Every Yom Kippur afternoon, for example, he would walk through the aisles of the Belz synagogue, intently scanning the faces of all the worshippers. Those who wondered about this practice were answered when he once spotted someone about to faint from the weakness of the fast. The rebbe pulled a piece of cake out of his pocket and immediately fed it to the ill man.

Rokeach battled the Haskalah movement that sought to introduce modernity and compromise in the Torah community. He often defended the Torah way of life to the leaders of the Haskalah's Shomer Yisrael organization. On one occasion, a leader of Shomer Yisrael asked him, "It isn’t right to be extreme and keep to the side of Hasidut or to the side of assimilation. What is wrong with taking the middle path?" The Rebbe responded, "Who walks at the side of the road? People! And who goes in the middle? Horses!"

To strengthen Torah Jewry against the inroads of Haskalah, the rebbe helped found the Machazikei Hadas organization, and the Machazikei Hadas newspaper, both of which still exist in the Belzer community.

Final months[edit]

His tombstone in Belz

In 1894 Rokeach began suffering from a string of strange maladies and began hinting to his Hasidim that his end was near. At one point, his Hasidim took him to Vienna to be operated upon by a specialist. The operation was deemed a success, but the Rebbe died as he was returning to Belz a short while later, at the age of 69.[1]

Rebbes of Belz[edit]

  1. Rabbi Sholom Rokeach (1779–1855)
  2. Rabbi Yehoshua Rokeach (1825–1894)
  3. Rabbi Yissachar Dov Rokeach (1854–1926)
  4. Rabbi Aharon Rokeach (1877–1957)
  5. Rabbi Yissachar Dov Rokeach (b. 1948)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tilles, Yerachmiel (2010). "A Surgical Procedure". chabad.org. Retrieved 2 January 2012. 

External links[edit]