Yellow Coach Manufacturing Company

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A Fifth Avenue Coach Company and Surface Transit Yellow Coach Z-BH-602 model.

The Yellow Coach Manufacturing Company (later Yellow Truck & Coach Manufacturing Company, informally Yellow Coach) was an early manufacturer of passenger buses in the United States. It was founded in Chicago as a subsidiary of the Yellow Cab Company in 1923 by John D. Hertz. General Motors purchased a majority stake in 1925, changing its name to 'Yellow Truck and Coach Manufacturing Company. They then bought the company outright in 1943 merging it into their GM Truck Division to form GM Truck & Coach Division. During its twenty-year existence, Yellow Coach built transit buses, electric-powered trolley buses, and parlor coaches.

Its car rental subsidiary (known both as 'Hertz Drivurself Corp' or 'Yellow Drive-It-Yourself') was purchased back by John Hertz in 1953 through The Omnibus Corporation and floated the following year as The Hertz Corporation.

History[edit]

Yellow Coach Manufacturing Co was founded in 1923 as a subsidiary of the Yellow Cab Company.[1]

G.J. Rackham, whose career had commenced with the London General Omnibus Company after the First World War, spent four years in the U.S. from 1922–1926 and recognised the advantage of low swept chassis frame for bus development whilst employed by Yellow Coach in Chicago. It is likely that he was 'headhunted' by Hertz to help start up the bus building business. In 1926, he returned to England to join Leyland Motors as Chief Engineer and was responsible for the groundbreaking Titan and Tiger models.[2]

General Motors purchased a majority stake in the company in 1925 and changed the name to the Yellow Truck & Coach Manufacturing Company.[3]

GM purchased the business outright in 1943 merging it into their GM Truck Division to form GM Truck & Coach Division.[1]

Although GM continued with the Yellow Coach product line, the Yellow Coach badge gave way to the GM Coach or just GM nameplate in 1944. GMC badges did not appear until 1968.

Car rental - Hertz Drivurself Corp/Yellow Drive-It-Yourself[edit]

The company owned a subsidiary, known as either Hertz 'Drivurself Corp' or 'Yellow Drive-It-Yourself' which was sold with Yellow Coach to General Motors and eventual purchased back by Hertz in 1953 with The Omnibus Corporation[4] which was the renamed The Hertz Corporation the following year.[5]

Models produced[edit]

U V W X Y Z models (1923–1936)[edit]

Model Seats Engine Type Notes
U-models (1928–1935)
U-16 16 front transit or parlor coach
U-29 29 front transit or parlor coach
V-models (1930–1936)
V-29 29 front parlor coach
V-225 29 front transit or parlor coach
V-A-634 front parlor coach
VR-819 front parlor coach
W-models (1928–1935)
W-21 18-21 front transit or parlor coach
X-models (1924–1928)
X-21 17-21 front parlor coach
Y-models (1924–1932)
Y-29 29 front parlor coach
Y-Z-227
Y-Z-229
Y-O-254
Y-U-316
Z-models (1923–1936)
Z-29 29 front transit
Z-63 front transit open-top double-decker
Z-66 front transit semi-enclosed double-decker
Z-67 front transit open-top double-decker
Z-200/Z-230 front transit open-top double-decker
Z-230-W-8 33 front transit
Z-225 front parlor coach
Z-250 33 front parlor coach
Z-240 gdx front transit
Z-255 33 front parlor coach
Z-A-199 front transit double-decker
Z-AAAM front transit open-top double-decker
Z-AL-265 front transit "All Service Vehicle" (combination bus/trolleybus)
Z-AQ-273
Z-BI-610 32 front parlor coach
Z-BP-620 38 front transit
Z-BR-602 62 front transit double-decker
Z-C-201 66 front transit double-decker
Z-CT-843
Z-E-203 front transit open-top double-decker
ZBQ-621 front transit gas-electric double-decker
Model Seats Engine Type Notes

700-series (1934–1937)[edit]

Model 719 in Greyhound Lines service

All models are 96-inch (2.4 m) wide single-deck buses, except as noted.[6]

Model Built Qty Seats Wheelbase Engine Mounted Type Notes
700 1932 5 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit built for Houston Electric Company
701 1931 12 44 213 in (5.4 m) 600 VDC rear trolley coach built for Wisconsin Gas & Electric Co. (Kenosha, WI)
702 1931 0 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit experimental specifications; replaced by model 705
703 1931 1 44 213 in (5.4 m) 600 VDC rear transit trolley coach demonstrator
704 1932 19 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit
705 1932 24 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit replaced by model 708
706 1933 1 72 212 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit "Queen Mary" double-deck prototype; built for Chicago Motor Coach Company; replaced by model 720
707 1931–1934 GM series 707 6 cyl. gas poppet valve engine; no other details
708 1933–1934 27 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit replaced by model 718
709 1933–1934 63 18 146 12 in (3.72 m) GM series 257 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body; replaced by model 714
710 1934 1 22 180 in (4.6 m) GM series 331 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body demonstrator; rebuilt into a model 713
711 1933–1934 131 30 178 58 in (4.54 m) GM series 400 6 cyl. gas rear transit 104-inch (2.6 m) wide version also built;[7] replaced by model 717
712 1933–1934 185 21 165 in (4.2 m) GM series 257 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body model; replaced by model 715
713 1934 2 24 175 in (4.4 m) GM series 331 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body demonstrators; replaced by model 716
714 1934 25 18 160 in (4.1 m) GM series 257 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body; revised model 711 with streamlining; replaced by model 733
715 1934 400 21 160 in (4.1 m) GM series 257 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body; revised model 712 with streamlining; replaced by model 733
716 1934–1937 183 23 179 in (4.5 m) GM series 331 6 cyl. gas forward transit 84 in (2.1 m) narrow body; revised model 713 with streamlining; replaced by model 739
717 1934–1936 122 30 178 58 in (4.54 m) GM series 400 6 cyl. gas transit revised model 711 with streamlining; 104-inch (2.6 m) wide version offered but not built;[7] replaced by model 728
718
Series 1
1934–1935 125 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit replaced model 708[8]
718
Series 2
1935 50 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit built for New York City Omnibus Corporation
718
Series 3
1935–1936 221 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit revised rear end and other general improvements; built for New York City Omnibus Corp.
718
Series 4
none built 0 no details
718
Series 5
1936–1937 22 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit left side emergency door; built for Pacific Electric Railway Co.
718
Series 6
1936 6 40 213 in (5.4 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit 44 in (110 cm) wide entrance, no center exit, left side emergency door; built for Pacific Electric Railway Co. and Los Angeles Railway Corp.; replaced by model 740
719
Ser. "EXP"
1934 3 37 243 in (6.2 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear interurban streamlined prototypes; built for Greyhound Lines
719 1935–1936 329 36 245 in (6.2 m) GM series 707 6 cyl. gas rear interurban streamlined; built for Greyhound; replaced by model 743
720
Series 1
1934 1 72 217 in (5.5 m) GM series 707 6 cyl. gas rear transit 12 ft 10 12 in (3.9 m) high double-decker; prototype; built for New York City Omnibus Corp.
720
Series 2
1936 100 72 217 in (5.5 m) GM series 707 6 cyl. gas rear transit built for Chicago Motor Coach Co.
720
Series 3
1936 25 72 217 in (5.5 m) GM series 707 6 cyl. gas rear transit built for New York City Omnibus Corp.
720
Series 4
1938 40 217 in (5.5 m) GM series 707 6 cyl. gas rear transit new fuel tank and battery location to eliminate fire hazards; built for Chicago Motor Coach Co.
720
Series 5
1938 35 72 217 in (5.5 m) GM series 707 6 cyl. gas rear transit new fuel tank and battery location to eliminate fire hazards; built for New York City Omnibus Corp.
721 1934 4 30 178 58 in (4.54 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit 104 in (2.6 m) wide body; replaced model 711; built for The Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company; replaced by model 1208
722 1934–1937 123 21 179 in (4.5 m) GM series 400 6 cyl. gas front parlor 84 in (2.1 m) narrow streamlined body; replaced by model 738
723 1934 14 21 179 in (4.5 m) GM series 331 6 cyl. gas forward parlor 84 in (2.1 m) narrow streamlined body; similar to model 722 except for drive train; replaced by model 738
724 1934 4 28 178 58 in (4.54 m) GM series 400 6 cyl. gas rear parlor streamlined; replaced model 717; replaced by model PG-29
725 1934 4 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit streamlined; Banker automatic transmission; total includes one experimental unit; replaced by model 728
726 none 0 41 232 12 in (5.91 m) GM series 616 6 cyl. gas rear transit streamlined; replaced model 718 incorporating model 725 type body construction
727 1934 10 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit streamlined; replaced model 725; total includes one experimental unit; replaced by model 721
728
Series 1
1935 100 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit replaced model 717;[7] 24 built with straight frame, 76 built with bottle-neck frame
728
Series 2
1935 165 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit bottle-neck frame
728
Series 3
1935–1936 177 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit four different clutch and shift (air or manual) versions offered
728
Series 4
1936 150 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit 18 built with flat floor, 132 built with floor ramped to rear
728
Series 5
1936 50 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit strengthened frame; all with ramped floor
728
Series 6
1936–1938 392 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit modified rear end for easier engine access; one rebuilt to series 6A prototype
728
Series 6A
1937–1938 92 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 479 6 cyl. gas rear transit same as series 6 except for engine
728
Series 6B
none 0 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 479 6 cyl. gas rear transit same as series 6A but with improved interior lighting
728
Series 7
1938–1939 31 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 479 6 cyl. gas rear transit rear end modified to accept either 479 or 529 engine; improved interior lighting; replaced by model TG-3201
729
Series 1
1935 61 36 213 78 in (5.43 m) GM series 450 supercharged 6 cyl. gas-electric rear transit "All Service Vehicle"; built for Public Service Coordinated Transport (Newark, NJ)
729
Series 2
1936 25 36 213 78 in (5.43 m) GM series 450 supercharged 6 cyl. gas-electric rear transit improved front and rear ends; built for Public Service Coordinated Transport
729
Series 3
1936 74 36 213 78 in (5.43 m) GM series 450 supercharged 6 cyl. gas-electric rear transit relocated electrical controller; built for Public Service Coordinated Transport
729
Series 4
1936 1 36 213 78 in (5.43 m) Hercules 474 c.i.d. 4 cyl. oil-electric rear transit similar to series 3 but with diesel-electric propulsion; built for Public Service Coordinated Transport
729
Series 5
1937 195 36 213 78 in (5.43 m) GM series 450 supercharged 6 cyl. gas-electric rear transit similar to series 3 but with improved chassis and drop-sash windows; built for Public Service Coordinated Transport
729
Series 6
1938 1 36 213 78 in (5.43 m) GM series 529 supercharged 6 cyl. gas-electric rear transit simplified version of series 5; built for Baltimore Transit Company
730 none 0 32 184 in (4.7 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit streamlined; intended to replace model 728; replaced by model 728 series 2
731
Series 1
1935 10 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit built for St. Louis Public Service Company
731
Series 2
1935 23 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit interchangeable frame for air or manual shift; 5 built with flat floor, 18 built with floor ramped to rear
731
Series 3
1936 50 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit strengthened frame; all with ramped floor
731
Series 4
1936 100 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit modified rear axle
732
Series 5
1936–1938 161 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 450 6 cyl. gas rear transit modified rear end for easier drive-train access
732
Series 5A
1937–1939 42 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 529 6 cyl. gas rear transit same as series 5 except for engine
732
Series 6
1937–1939 158 36 214 58 in (5.45 m) GM series 529 6 cyl. gas rear transit streamlined; improved interior lighting; replaced by model TG-3601
733 front transit
734 rear suburban
735 rear transit double-decker
736 diesel rear
738 rear small parlor
739 rear small transit
740 rear transit
741 gas-electric rear transit "All Service Vehicle"
742 1937–1939 172 37 rear suburban replaced by model 1210[9]
743 rear parlor built exclusively for Greyhound and affiliates
744 36 rear transit
745 rear sleeper coach
746 diesel-electric rear transit "All Service Vehicle"
Model Built Qty Seats Wheelbase Engine Mounted Type Notes

1200-series (1938–1940)[edit]

Model Seats Type Engine Notes
1203 transit
1204 24 transit rear produced 1938–1940; replaced by model TG-2401[10]
1208 41 transit trolleybus 40 units built in 1938 for The Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company; last YC trolleybuses[11]
1209 25 parlor rear "Cruiserette"; replaced by model PG-2501[12]
1210 37 parlor rear 46 units produced in 1939; replaced by models PG-3701 and PD-3701[13]
1213 29 parlor rear replaced model 724; replaced by model PG-2901 without change

T-series (1940–1942)[edit]

All models were transit buses. TD models were diesel powered; TDE used diesel-electric propulsion; TG models had gasoline engines. Note that Yellow Coach realigned all models to series 05 in 1941.

Front engine[edit]

Model Seats
TG-2101 21
TG-2102 21
TG-2105 21
TD-2401/TG-2401 24
TG-2402 24
TG-2405 24
 

Rear engine "old-look"[edit]

Model Seats Length
TD-2501/TDE-2501 25
TD-2502 25
TD-2701/TG-2701 27 25 feet (7.6 m)
TD-2705/TG-2705 27
TG-2706 27
TD-3201/TG-3201 32 28 feet (8.5 m)
TD-3205/TG-3205 32
TD-3601/TG-3601 36 30 feet 7 inches (9.32 m)
TD-3602/TG-3602 36
TG-3603 36
TD-3605/TG-3605 36
TD-3606/TG-3606 36
TD-4001/TDE-4001/TG-4001 40 33 feet (10 m)
TDE-4002 40
TD-4005/TDE-4005/TG-4005 40
TD-4006 40
TG-4501 45 35 feet (11 m)
TD-4502/TG-4502 45
TD-4503 45
TD-4505/TG-4505 45
TD-5401 54 41 feet 6 inches (12.65 m)

P-series (1939–1944)[edit]

All models are 96-inch (2.4 m) wide rear-engine parlor coaches.[14][15][16]

Model Built Quantity Seats Length Engine Notes
PG-2501 1939–1940 8 25 30 ft 1 in (9.2 m) GMC 248 6 cyl. gas Replaced model 1209 (1st series) without change.
PG-2502 1939–1940 66 GMC 308 6 cyl. gas Raised rear end with different fan, radiator arrangement and transmission than PG-2501.
PG-2503 1941 4 GMC 248 6 cyl. gas Same as PG-2501 with-two rod transmission shift, improved frame, improved engine mounts, conventional clutch pedal and sealed beam headlights; also includes appearance changes as listed under PG-2505.
PG-2504 1940–1941 70 GMC 308 6 cyl. gas Same as PG-2502 with two-rod transmission shift, improved frame, improved engine mounts, conventional clutch pedal and sealed beam headlights.
PG-2505 1941–1942 118 GMC 308 6 cyl. gas Same as PG-2504 with improved interior appearance and numerous special items now incorporated as standard.
PG-2901 1939–1940 50 29 33 ft 0 in (10.1 m) GMC 426 6 cyl. gas "Cruiserette";[12] replaced model 1213 without change.
PD-2901 1939–1940 16 GMC 4-71 4 cyl. diesel "Cruiserette"
PG-2902 1940–1941 56 GMC 426 6 cyl. gas "Cruiserette"; same as PG-2901 with two-rod transmission shift, and sealed beam headlights, double-wrapped spring eyes and improved double-drag steering link.
PD-2902 1941–1942 249 GMC 4-71 4 cyl. diesel "Cruiserette"; same as PD-2901 with improved interior appearance and numerous special items now incorporated as standard.
PG-2903 1941–1942 304 GMC 426 6 cyl. gas "Cruiserette"; same as PG-2902 with improved interior appearance and numerous special items now incorporated as standard.
PD-3301 1942 115 33 33 ft 0 in (10.1 m) GMC 4-71 4 cyl. diesel Construction and appearance similar to PG-2900s.
PG-3301 1942–1943 49 GMC 477 6 cyl. gas
PD-3701 1940–1941 59 37 35 ft 0 in (10.7 m) GMC 6-71 6 cyl. diesel "Silversides"[13]
PDG-3701 1940–1941 240 GMC 6-71 6 cyl. diesel Greyhound version of the PD-3701.
PG-3701 1940–1941 70 GMC 707 6 cyl. gas
PGG-3701 1940–1941 91 GMC 707 6 cyl. gas Greyhound version of the PG-3701.
PDA-3701 1942–1943 185 GMC 4-71 4 cyl. diesel Construction and appearance similar to PG-2900s.
PGA-3701 1942–1943 51 GMC 477 6 cyl. gas
PDG-4101 1940–1941 224 41 35 ft 0 in (10.7 m) GMC 6-71 6 cyl. diesel 1940 Greyhound specifications.
PGG-4101 1940–1941 35 GMC 707 6 cyl. gas 1940 Greyhound specifications.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yellow Coach Buses 1923 Through 1943: Photo Archive. 2001. p. 8. ISBN 1-58388-054-2. 
  2. ^ Townsin, Alan A. and Senior John A. (1979). The Best of British Buses No.1 Leyland Titans 1927-42. Glossop: Transport Publishing Company. p. 7. ISBN 9780903839563. 
  3. ^ "Yellow Taxicab...". 
  4. ^ "John Daniel Hertz". 
  5. ^ "Hertz History". In 1953, the Hertz properties were bought from GMC by the Omnibus Corporation, which divested itself of its bus interests and concentrated solely on car and truck renting and leasing. A year later, a new name was taken—The Hertz Corporation—and it was listed for the first time on the New York Stock Exchange. 
  6. ^ "Yellow Coach 700 series coaches". GM Engineering Standards Coach Descriptions. The Ohio Museum of Transportation. 7 January 2002. Retrieved 13 January 2002. 
  7. ^ a b c Johnson, Gary (1985). "1934 Yellow 717". Model Coach News (Lynnfield, MA) (51): 5–10. 
  8. ^ Johnson, Gary (1983). "1934 Yellow Coach 718". Model Coach News (Lynnfield, MA) (41): 6–8. 
  9. ^ Johnson, Gary (1987). "Yellow Coach 742". Model Coach News (Lynnfield, MA) (59): 3–8. 
  10. ^ Lafreniere, Kevin (11 October 2010). "Yellow Coach 1204". Canadian Public Transit Discussion Board > Wiki. Retrieved 19 December 2010. 
  11. ^ Schultz, Russell E. (June 1980). A Milwaukee Transport Era: The Trackless Trolley Years. Interurbans Special 74. Glendale, CA: Interurbans. pp. 29,30,112,117. ISBN 0-916374-43-2. 
  12. ^ a b Johnson, Gary (March–April 1983). "Prewar Yellow Cruiserettes". Model Coach News (Lynnfield, MA) (39): 7–10. 
  13. ^ a b Johnson, Gary (1992). "1939 Yellow Coach 1210 parlor coach". Model Coach News (Lynnfield, MA) (69): 5–6. 
  14. ^ "2XXX Series Parlor Coaches". GM Engineering Standards Coach Descriptions. The Ohio Museum of Transportation. 7 January 2002. Retrieved 13 January 2002. 
  15. ^ "3XXX Series Parlor Coaches". GM Engineering Standards Coach Descriptions. The Ohio Museum of Transportation. 7 January 2002. Retrieved 13 January 2002. 
  16. ^ "4XXX Series Parlor Coaches". GM Engineering Standards Coach Descriptions. The Ohio Museum of Transportation. 7 January 2002. Retrieved 13 January 2002. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Luke, William A. (2001). Yellow Coach Buses - 1923–1943 Photo Archive, Hudson, WI: Iconografix. ISBN 1-58388-054-2
  • Luke, William A. & Metler, Linda L. (2004). Highway Buses of the 20th Century, Hudson, WI: Iconografix. ISBN 1-58388-121-2
  • Luke, William A. & Metler, Linda L. (2005). City Transit Buses of the 20th Century, Hudson, WI: Iconografix. ISBN 1-58388-146-8
  • McKane, John H. & Squier, Gerald L. (2006). Welcome Aboard the GM New Look Bus, Hudson, WI: Iconografix. ISBN 1-58388-167-0
  • Plachno, Larry (2002). Greyhound Buses Through the Years - Part I, Polo, Il: National Bus Trader Magazine, November, 2002
  • Stauss, Ed (1988). The Bus World Encyclopedia of Buses, Woodland Hills, CA: Stauss Publications. ISBN 0-9619830-0-0

External links[edit]