Yellow crookneck squash

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Cucurbita pepo
'Yellow crookneck'
Crookneck2.jpg
Crookneck squash along with other types of squash
Species Cucurbita pepo
Cultivar Yellow crookneck
Origin Eastern North America
Crookneck squash
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 19 kcal (79 kJ)
3.9 g
Dietary fiber 1.0 g
0.3 g
1.0 g
Vitamins
Riboflavin (B2)
(3%)
0.04 mg
Vitamin C
(23%)
19 mg
Trace metals
Potassium
(5%)
222 mg
Other constituents
Water 94 g
Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Yellow crookneck squash is one of the many cultivars of Cucurbita pepo,[1] the species that also includes some pumpkins and most other summer squashes. The plants are bushy,[1] and do not spread like the plants of winter squash and pumpkin.[2] It is most often used as a summer squash, and is characterized by its bumpy,[2] yellow skin and sweet yellow flesh, as well as its distinctive curved stem-end or "crooked neck".[3] It should not be confused with crookneck cultivars of Cucurbita moschata, such as the winter squash 'Golden Cushaw',[4] or the vining summer squash 'Tromboncino'.[1] Its name distinguishes it from its close relative, the yellow summer squash, which has a straight neck.

Yellow crookneck squash are generally harvested immature, when they are less than two inches in diameter,[2][3] since the skin toughens and the quality degrades as the squash reaches full maturity.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Zucchetta". Mount Vernon Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center: Vegetable Research and Extension. Washington State University. Retrieved 10 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Summer Squash". Watch Your Garden Grow. University of Illinois Extension. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Summer Squash". University of the District of Columbia Cooperative Extension Service. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  4. ^ Phillips, R.; Rix, M. (1993). Vegetables. New York: Random House. 
  5. ^ "Summer and Winter Squash". Utah State University Cooperative Extension. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 

External links[edit]

While the skin appears rough from a distance, they actually have a smooth texture.