Yiannis Pharmakis

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Yiannis Pharmakis
Ιωάννης Φαρμάκης
Born 1772
Vlasti, Macedonia, Ottoman Empire
Died 1821
Constantinople, Ottoman Empire
Allegiance Greece
Battles/wars Greek War of Independence

Yiannis Pharmakis or Ioannis Farmakis (Greek: Ιωάννης Φαρμάκης) (1772–1821), born in Vlasti, Macedonia (Greece), was a Greek[1] revolutionary leader of the Greek War of Independence, active in Wallachia and Moldavia.[2][3]

Ιωάννης Φαρμάκης

Initially a commander of the Princely guard in Bucharest, Pharmakis joined the Philikí Etaireía movement and became an aide to Alexander Ypsilantis, establishing a permanent link with the non-Greek Oltenian Pandurs led by Tudor Vladimirescu. He and Giorgakis Olympios reached an agreement with Tudor in the early months of 1821, but, since the relation between the two factions soured as an effect of Russian and Ottoman Empire intervention, the two (joined by Dimitrie Macedonski) decided to arrest Vladimirescu (who was to be executed on June 7). As the insurgency crumbled under Turkish attacks, Pharmakis retreated to the Secu Monastery in Neamţ county, organising his last stand together with 380 to 500 of his men. Eventually he and his officers surrendered under conditions of general amnesty but the Ottoman troops captured and sent them to Constantinople, where they were publicly executed in 1821.

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Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Dakin. The unification of Greece, 1770-1923. Benn, 1972, p. 39: "Farmakis and other chiefs were humiliated and tortured, and were then sent to Constantinople where they were put to death. Thus perished two of the great sons of the Greek nation".
  2. ^ Hidryma Meletōn Chersonēsou tou Haimou (Thessalonikē, Greece) (1970). Balkan Studies: Biannual Publication of the Institute for Balkan Studies, Volumes 11-12. The Institute. p. 72. 
  3. ^ Sakellariou, M. V. (1992). Macedonia, 4000 Years of Greek History and Civilization. Ekdotikè Athenon. p. 438. 

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