Yochi Dreazen

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Yochi J. Dreazen (born c. 1976) is an American reporter for Foreign Policy. He previously was a reporter for the National Journal. His area of expertise is military affairs and national security.[1] He is a frequent guest on radio and television programs, including The Diane Rehm Show (NPR) and Washington Week with Gwen Ifill (PBS).[2]

Dreazen was born in Chicago, Illinois, US. In 1994, he graduated from the Ida Crown Jewish Academy, where he started a student newspaper. He spent a year in Israel before attending college.[3][4] He graduated magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999, with degrees in history and English. As a student at the University of Pennsylvania, Dreazen edited the independent student newspaper, The Daily Pennsylvanian.[5]

Dreazen's first employer was The Wall Street Journal. He arrived in Iraq in April 2003, less than a month after the start of the Iraq War, with the 4th Infantry Division; he lived in Baghdad for the next two and a half years, where he was The Wall Street Journal's main Iraq correspondent.[2]

In total, Dreazen spent more than five years in Iraq and Afghanistan during the 11 years he worked at The Wall Street Journal. He has reported from more than three dozen countries, including China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey.[5]

In 2010, the Military Reporters & Editors Association recognized Dreazen's work with its top award for domestic coverage.[6] His work included articles about suicide among soldiers and the psychological traumas that affect veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.[5]

Dreazen lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife Annie Rosenzweig.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rothstein, Betsy (July 12, 2010). "NJ Hires Yochi Dreazen from WSJ". FishbowlDC. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Yochi Dreazen". Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Our Alumni Have the World at Their Fingertips". Ida Crown Jewish Academy. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Yochi Dreazen". Ida Crown Jewish Academy. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c "Yochi J. Dreazen". National Journal. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  6. ^ "MRE 2010 contest winners announced". Military Reporters & Editors Association. October 12, 2010. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  7. ^ Greenberg, Richard (September 1, 2011). "Jewish Mom's 'Operation Shidduch' in Iraq Pays Off in Daughter's Marriage". j. Retrieved November 4, 2011. 
  8. ^ Kelly, Janet Bennett (June 30, 2011). "OnLove: Anne Rosenzweig weds Yochi Dreazen". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 

External links[edit]