York Corporation Tramways

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York Corporation Tramways
York Corporation Tramways.jpg
Map of York Corporation Tramways
Operation
Locale York
Open 20 January 1910
Close 16 November 1935
Status Closed
Infrastructure
Track gauge 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm)
Propulsion system(s) Electric
Depot(s) Fulford Cross
Statistics
Route length 8.49 miles (13.66 km)

The York Corporation Tramways provided an electric tramway service in York between 1910 and 1935.[1]

History[edit]

In 1909 the Corporation of York purchased the assets of the City of York Tramways Company for £8,856[2] (£781,632 in 2014).[3] Initially it took over the operation of the horse-drawn tramway, but put into effect immediate plans for its electrification and extension. These modernisation works were carried out at a cost of £89,471 (£7,896,725 in 2014).[3]

Fleet[edit]

The company operated a fleet of 45 tramcars.

  • 1–18 Eighteen cars 1910 from British Thomson-Houston for £10,914 (£943,331 in 2014) [3] (including No 19)
  • 19 Water car 1910 from British Thomson-Houston
  • 20–23 Four additional cars 1912 from British Thomson-Houston
  • 24–27 Four additional cars 1912 from British Thomson-Houston at a cost of £550 10s each (£46,148 in 2014),[3]
  • 28–31 Four additional cars 1913 from Brush for a total of £2,960 (£246,614 in 2014),[3]
  • 32–35 Four trailer cars 1914 from Brush for a total of £1,912 (£155,364 in 2014) [3]
  • 36–41 Six additional cars 1915 from Brush at a cost of £811, 10s each (£55,060 in 2014),[3]

Before 1925, the fleet was renumbered and new cars were delivered:

  • 1–26 (Original 1–18 and 20–27)
  • 27–30 (Original 28–31)
  • 31–36 (Original 36–41)
  • 37 English Electric Company 1925 single man operated (damaged in a collision in 1925). Converted to a sand and salt carrier.
  • 37–38 Two cars built by the company in 1929 from the truck from the water car, a spare truck and the trailer bodies.
  • 39–41 Three second hand cars from the Wolverhampton Corporation Tramways (Wolverhampton numbers 46, 50 and 56).
  • 42–45 Four second hand cars from the Burton upon Trent Corporation Tramways (Burton number 21-24).

Routes[edit]

The system eventually expanded to 6 main routes out from the city centre:

  • Acomb Road
  • Tadcaster Road (from the junction with Ainsty Avenue)
  • Queen Victoria Street (from the junction with Albermarle Road) via Bishopthorpe Road
  • Fulford Village (the depot was off Fulford Road opposite the Infantry Barracks at SE 6085 5013.
  • Lawrence Street and Hull Road (from the location of the Beeswing Hotel)
  • Haxby Road (from the Rowntree's Cocoa Works))

Closure[edit]

The system was closed on 16 November 1935.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Golden Age of Tramways. Published by Taylor and Francis.
  2. ^ Tramway Review, Issue 18, 1955.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g UK CPI inflation numbers based on data available from Gregory Clark (2013), "What Were the British Earnings and Prices Then? (New Series)" MeasuringWorth.