York and Sawyer

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The former headquarters of the Brooklyn Trust Company (now a branch of Chase) in Brooklyn Heights, modeled after the Palazzo della Gran Guardia in Verona.

The architectural firm of York and Sawyer produced many outstanding structures, exemplary of Beaux-Arts architecture as it was practiced in the United States. The partners Edward York (1863–1928) and Philip Sawyer (1868–1949) had both trained in the office of McKim, Mead, and White. In 1898, they established their independent firm, based in New York City.

Their structure for the New-York Historical Society (1908) was extended in 1938 by Walker & Gillette. Their ability to organize, separate and coordinate mixed uses in a building is exemplified by their massive New York Athletic Club.

York and Sawyer became known as specialists in the design of banks and hospitals. Their palatial Renaissance and classical bank buildings express the reassuring stability and awe-inspiring splendor the institutions wished to project. In each typical case a spectacular banking hall was the public space, often integrated within an office building. Original architectural drawings by York and Sawyer are held in the Dept. of Drawings & Archives at Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University in New York City.

Works[edit]

The former headquarters of Riggs Bank (left) and the American Security and Trust Company (right), located on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.

Their New York banks won them the commission for 15 Westminster Street, Providence, Rhode Island (1920), which incorporated a monumental banking hall into an office block, and the 22-storey Old Royal Bank Building, Montreal, now the Royal Bank building (1926–1928), the tallest building in the British Empire when it was completed.

Associate architects and partners[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. “Vassar College: An Architectural Tour.” The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p. 70-71
  2. ^ http://midddigital.middlebury.edu/walking_history/college_campus/page_2.html
  3. ^ a b Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. “Vassar College: An Architectural Tour.” The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p.113
  4. ^ Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. “Vassar College: An Architectural Tour.” The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p.138
  5. ^ Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. “Vassar College: An Architectural Tour.” The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p.102
  6. ^ Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. “Vassar College: An Architectural Tour.” The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p.59
  7. ^ Karen Van Lengen and Lisa Reilly. “Vassar College: An Architectural Tour.” The Campus Guide Series. (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2004), p.88-101
  8. ^ gsa.gov
Bibliography
  • Kathryn Horste, 1997 The Michigan Law Quadrangle: Architecture and Origins (University of Michigan)

External links[edit]