Yorkstone

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Yorkstone is a term for a variety of sandstone,[1] specifically from quarries in Yorkshire that have been worked since mediaeval times, but now applied generally. Yorkstone is a tight grained, Carboniferous sedimentary rock. The stone consists of quartz, mica, feldspar, clay and iron oxides.

Known for its hard wearing and durable qualities Yorkstone has been used in a wide array of building, construction and landscaping applications around the world for many years. In Yorkshire, split stones called thackstone (Scots thack, English thatch) were employed as roofing. The traditional London paving stone has been York stone.

Yorkstone is popular in both new construction and restoration. The colour of Yorkstone depends on the minerals within its makeup and differs throughout the quarries from which it is mined. Newly quarried Yorkstone is usually available as slabs for paving, setts and walling stones. Reused Yorkstone paving, salvaged from demolished sites, is valued for its naturally weathered surfaces.[1]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gould, Kate (29 February 2012). "Designing small gardens: choosing stones". The Guardian. Retrieved 9 April 2014.