Yoshie Takeshita

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Yoshie Takeshita
Yoshie Takeshita, 2007-11-06.jpg
Personal information
Full name Yoshie Takeshita
Nickname Tenn
Born (1978-03-18)March 18, 1978
Kitakyushu city, Fukuoka, Japan
Height 159 cm (5 ft 3 in)
Weight 53 kg (117 lb)[1]
Spike 280cm
Block 270cm
Volleyball information
Position Setter
National team
 Japan (1997-)
Yoshie Takeshita
Medal record
Women's Volleyball
Competitor for  Japan
Olympic Games
Bronze 2012 London Team
World Championship
Bronze 2010 Japan Team
World Grand Champions Cup
Bronze 2001 Japan Team
Asian Games
Silver 2006 Doha Team
Asian Championship
Gold 2007 Suphanburi Team
Silver 2011 Taipei Team
Bronze 2009 Hanoi Team

Yoshie Takeshita (竹下 佳江 Takeshita Yoshie, born March 18, 1978) is a Japanese volleyball player who played for JT Marvelous.

She plays for the All-Japan women's volleyball team and was a participant at the 2004 Summer Olympics, 2008 Summer Olympics and 2012 Olympics. At the 2012 Olympics, she was part of the Japanese team that won the bronze medal.[2] She was also part of the 2010 Japanese Women's team that won bronze at the world championships, beating the US in the bronze medal match.[3]

Her nickname is World's smallest and strongest setter (世界 最小 最強 セッター Sekai saisho saikyo setter). She was the captain of the Japanese volleyball team during the 2006 World Championship and took the most valuable player award.

On 28 September 2012 JT Marvelous announce her retirement.[4] On 21 June 2013 Takeshita was selected the member of directors of Japan Volleyball Association.[5]

Her husband is a Japanese baseball player Hirotaka Egusa.

Profile[edit]

  • She became a volleyball player at 10 years old.
  • Her nickname is "Tenn", though she has not publicly revealed the meaning or origin of the nickname.

Clubs[edit]

Awards[edit]

Individual[edit]

Team[edit]

  • 1998 4th V.League - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with NEC Red Rockets.
  • 2000 6th V.League - Simple cup icon.svg Champion, with NEC Red Rockets.
  • 2001 Kurowashiki All Japan Volleyball Championship - Simple cup icon.svg Champion, with NEC Red Rockets.
  • 2002 8th V.League - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with NEC Red Rockets.
  • 2003 Kurowashiki All Japan Volleyball Championship - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2004 Kurowashiki All Japan Volleyball Championship - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2006-2007 V.Premier League - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2007 Kurowashiki All Japan Volleyball Championship - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2009-2010 V.Premier League - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2010 Kurowashiki All Japan Volleyball Tournament - Gorm silver cup.jpg Runner-Up, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2010-2011 V.Premier League - Simple cup icon.svg Champion, with JT Marvelous.
  • 2011 Kurowashiki All Japan Volleyball Tournament - Simple cup icon.svg Champion, with JT Marvelous.

National team[edit]

Senior team[edit]

  • 2003: 5th place in the World Cup in Japan
  • 2004: 5th place in the Olympic Games of Athens
  • 2005: Med 3.png Bronze Medal in the 13th Senior Asian Championship
  • 2006: 6th place in the World Championship in Japan
  • 2006: Med 2.png Silver Medal in Asian Game 2006
  • 2007: 7th place in the World Cup in Japan
  • 2007: Med 1.png Gold Medal in the 14th Senior Asian Championship at Thailand
  • 2008: 5th place in the Olympic Games of Beijing
  • 2010: Med 3.png Bronze Medal in the World Championship
  • 2011: 5th place in the World Grand Prix Final round
  • 2011: Med 2.png Silver Medal in the 16th Senior Asian Championship
  • 2011: 4th place in the World Cup in Japan
  • 2012: Med 3.png Bronze Medal in the Olympic Games of London

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Japanese Medalists in London 2012 Olympics". joc.or.jp. Japanese Olympic Committee. Retrieved 17 January 2014. 
  2. ^ "London 2012 - Women's Volleyball". www.olympic.org. IOC. Retrieved 12 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "2010 Women's World Championship". www.fivb.org. FIVB. Retrieved 12 October 2014. 
  4. ^ JT Marverous. "竹下佳江選手 退部のお知らせ". Retrieved 2012-09-28. 
  5. ^ Japan Volleyball Association. "The member of directors". Retrieved 2013-06-21. 
  6. ^ FIVB. "Best Digger". Retrieved 2011-11-18. 

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Italy Elisa Togut
2006 FIVB World Championship's
Women's Most Valuable Player

2006
Succeeded by
RussiaYekaterina Gamova
Preceded by
Brazil Marcelle Rodrigues
2006 FIVB World Championship's
Women's Best Setter

2006
Succeeded by
ChinaWei Qiuyue