You're Breaking My Heart

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with the Harry Nilsson song from the album Son of Schmilsson.

"You're Breaking My Heart" is a popular song. The song was published in 1948. Though credited to Pat Genaro and Sunny Skylar, (With acknowledgements to the owners of the copyright in "Tis the Day") the song is just an American version of the famous Italian song 'Mattinata' written by Ruggero Leoncavallo in the beginning of 20th century.

Popular versions on the charts in 1949 included recordings by Vic Damone, The Ink Spots, Buddy Clark, and Jan Garber.

The Vic Damone recording was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 5271. The flip side was "Four Winds and Seven Seas." The recording first entered the Billboard chart on June 10, 1949, lasting 26 weeks and peaking at position #1. [1]

The Ink Spots' recording featuring Bill Kenny (June 27, 1949) was released by Decca Records as catalog number 24693. The recording first entered the Billboard chart on August 12, 1949, lasting 14 weeks and peaking at position #9. [1]

The Buddy Clark recording was recorded on June 21, 1949, and released by Columbia Records as catalog number 38546. The recording first entered the Billboard chart on September 2, 1949, lasting 13 weeks and peaking at position #9. [1]

The Jan Garber recording was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 719 with "Now That I Need You" on the flip side. The recording first entered the Billboard chart on September 23, 1949, lasting two weeks and peaking at position #26. [1]

The song was also recorded by Ralph Flanagan and his orchestra, with vocalist Harry Prime, on August 18, 1949, and released by the Bluebird Records subsidiary of RCA Victor Records as catalog number 30-0001. [1]

Keely Smith's remake made the British Top 20 in 1965.

Preceded by
"Some Enchanted Evening" by Perry Como
U.S. Billboard Best Sellers in Stores number-one single
September 3–24, 1949
Succeeded by
"That Lucky Old Sun" by Frankie Laine

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research.