Young Living

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Young Living
Type Private
Industry multi-level marketing
Founded 1993 (1993)
Founders Donald Gary Young
Headquarters Lehi, Utah, United States
Area served International
Key people Donald Gary Young (Founder and CEO)
Products Essential oils, home products

Young Living is a Lehi, Utah based company which uses multi-level marketing to sell essential oils and other related products. The company was founded in 1993 by Donald Gary Young.[1]

Company info[edit]

Young Living is a multi-level marketing company; i.e. the company recruits "thousands of independent distributors who can sell directly to customers and earn commissions on sales to distributors recruited into a hierarchical network called 'downlines'."[2]

In August 2013, Young Living filed suit against doTerra for theft of trade secrets, alleging that the company had recreated their production process illegally.[2][3] doTerra retaliated by filing suit against Young Living under the accusation that the company had illegally and inaccurately tested their products in a lab, then posted erroneous test results publicly on their website.[4] Chemist Robert Pappas has said the oils, which were tested by the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, did not apparently match any oils sold by doTerra.[5] Additionally, Pappas has given a court deposition saying that Young Living utilized synthetic chemicals in some of their organic products.[6]

In September 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Young Living against marketing its products as possible treatments or cures for Ebola.[7]

On September 22, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Young Living that many of their Essential Oil products, such as, but not limited to, "Thieves," "Cinnamon Bark," "Oregano," "ImmuPower," "Rosemary," "Myrtle," "Sandalwood," "Eucalyptus Blue," "Peppermint," "Ylang Ylang," "Frankincense," and "Orange," are promoted for conditions that cause them to be drugs under section 201(g)(1)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 U.S.C. § 321(g)(1)(B)], because they are intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Young Living Opportunity". 
  2. ^ a b Harvey, Tom (1 August 2013). "Essential oils rivalry spills into Utah courts". Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved 19 June 2014. 
  3. ^ "Young Living Essential Oils, LC (Plaintiff) v. doTERRA, Inc., et al. (Defendants)". United States District Court for the District of Utah Central Division. July 18, 2013. Retrieved 2014-08-20. 
  4. ^ Huff, Ethan A. (13 September 2013). "Essential oils manufacturers Young Living and doTERRA battle it out in court over alleged theft of trade secrets, phony lab tests and false advertising". Natural News. Retrieved 20 June 2014. 
  5. ^ Markosian, Richard (21 August 2014). "Report Used in Young Living Farms Case Against DoTERRA Suspect". Utah Stories. Retrieved 6 September 2014. 
  6. ^ Keeson, Arvid (15 August 2014). "Damning Evidence That Young Living and DoTERRA’s Essential Oils are Adulterated". Utah Stories. Retrieved 6 September 2014. 
  7. ^ Ohlheiser, Abby (24 September 2014). "FDA warns three companies against marketing their products as Ebola treatments or cures". Washington Post. Retrieved 26 September 2014. 
  8. ^ Mitchell, LaTonya (22 September 2014). "Warning Letters>2014>Young Living 9/22/14". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 

External links[edit]