Yvonne Lime

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Yvonne Glee Lime Fedderson
Born (1935-04-07) April 7, 1935 (age 79)
Glendale, California, USA
Residence Paradise Valley, Arizona
Alma mater

Glendale High School

Pasadena Playhouse
Occupation Actress; Philanthropist
Spouse(s) Don Fedderson (married 1969-1994, his death)
Children

Dionne Fedderson
Seven stepchildren, including

Mike Minor[1]

Yvonne Glee Lime Fedderson (born April 7, 1935) is an American former actress who was married to the late producer Don Fedderson.[1] She appeared on screen from 1956 to 1968. Thereafter, she devoted much of her time to philanthropy, working to alleviate the plight of orphans worldwide and neglected children in the United States.

Background[edit]

Though she has long used the name "Yvonne Fedderson", she was born Yvonne Glee Lime in Glendale, California, the daughter of a music teacher who encouraged her to become an actress.[2] She graduated in 1953 from Glendale High School, having obtained a special permit to attend there, rather than the otherwise assigned Hoover High School.

Lime recalls her years at Glendale High School with jubilation:

Growing up in the '40s and '50s was great! You felt safe in school, and looked forward to every day. Seeing your friends each day, getting an education, and planning for the future were adventures we welcomed. Our dances and social events were fun, and our parents never had to worry about our using drugs, or having someone going crazy with a gun and shooting a group of us. ... My years at Glendale High were a time of ponytails and poodle skirts for the girls, and crew cuts and hot rods for the boys. A girl dreamed of

"going steady" with a guy, especially if he had a letterman sweater that she could wear. Everyone looked forward to the semester breaks, and Easter vacation week was always a time to go to Balboa Island with your friends. ...[3]

After high school, Lime attended the Pasadena Playhouse, where her performance in a production of Thornton Wilder's Ah, Wilderness! attracted the attention of an agent. This landed her into the recurring part of Dottie Snow on twelve episodes of Robert Young's situation comedy, Father Knows Best. She played a friend of the Betty Anderson character, portrayed by Elinor Donahue.[2]

Acting and philanthrophy[edit]

In 1957, she was cast in films, in an uncredited part as "Sally" in Elvis Presley's Loving You and in Michael Landon's I Was a Teenage Werewolf.[2] She and Don Fedderson had a daughter, Dionne Fedderson; he had seven children from two previous marriages. Don Fedderson produced three popular television series, The Millionaire, My Three Sons, and Family Affair.[1] After she married Fedderson, Lime left acting to concentrate her time to philanthropy. In the 1950s, she had entertained American troops stationed in Japan. Fedderson and fellow actress, Sara Buckner O'Meara, who met on the set of The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, in which they were both guest stars, launched International Orphans Inc., a charity which built and maintained four orphanages in Japan and five orphanages, a hospital, and a school in Vietnam. Fedderson and O'Meara later devoted their efforts to assist neglected children in the United States and renamed their group, Childhelp, an organization based in Scottsdale, Arizona. The two were also involved in Operation Babylift at the time of the United States evacuation of the former South Vietnam.[2]

From 1960 to 1961, Yvonne Lime had a co-starring role as Sally Day in the 16-episode NBC sitcom, Happy, in which she and Ronnie Burns, the late adopted son of George Burns and Gracie Allen, played owners of a motel in southern California who have a talking baby called "Happy." Lloyd Corrigan and Doris Packer were regulars on the series, which began as a summer replacement in 1960 for The Perry Como Show and thereafter in 1961 for several episodes on the regular NBC schedule.[4] She had also appeared in varying roles from 1956 to 1958 in eleven episodes of The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show.[5]

Lime's first television appearance was on her future husband's The Millionaire as the character "Eileen" in "The Story of Joy Costello." She appeared in 1956 as Mary Lou Carter in the episode, "The Select Females," of the CBS/Desilu series, The Adventures of Jim Bowie starring Scott Forbes. In 1957, she portrayed Gloria Binks in the Hardy Boys serial, The Mystery of the Ghost Farm. That same year she played a character "Mary" in "A Coney Island Wedding" on the ABC series about the clergy, Crossroads. In 1958, she played "Iris" on "Ladies' Aide", an episode of Jackie Cooper's The People's Choice, which features a talking basset hound, the premise which led two years later to the child "Happy."[5]

From 1959 to 1961, she appeared twice each on two CBS sitcoms, Dwayne Hickman's The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis and Frank Aletter's Bringing Up Buddy. Lime also was cast in episodes of NBC's Wichita Town and Bat Masterson, and on CBS's Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Her last acting role was on My Three Sons as "Linda" in the 1968 episode "The Grandfathers."[5]

Fedderson today[edit]

Yvonne Lime Fedderson and her daughter, Dionne, reside in Paradise Valley in Maricopa County, Arizona. She is the author of Miracle Healing: God's Call: Testimonials of Miracles Through Sara Buckner O'Meara, published in 2011.[6]

Childhelp founders Fedderson and O'Meara have been nominated five times for the Nobel Peace Prize.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Donald Fedderson, TV Producer, Is Dead at 81, December 22, 1994". The New York Times. Retrieved September 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Biography of Yvonne Fedderson". Internet Movie Data Base. Retrieved May 27, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Testimonial from Yvonne Lime Fedderson, May 17, 2001". Glendale News-Press. Retrieved September 2, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Happy". imdb.com. Retrieved May 27, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c "Yvonne Fedderson". imdb.com. Retrieved May 27, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Yvonne Lime Fedderson". goodreads.com. Retrieved September 2, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Yvonne Fedderson". zoominfo.com. Retrieved September 2, 2013.