Z-Train

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For the New York City Subway service, see Z (New York City Subway service).

The Z-Train was the original name of a proposed passenger train service that would operate primarily on Union Pacific Railroad lines between Los Angeles Union Station, Ontario, California, and a new station to be built adjacent to the Las Vegas Strip, with a travel time of five to five-and-a-half hours.[1] Amtrak last operated passenger train service to Las Vegas in 1997 on the Desert Wind. The train would offer an alternative to traveling on congested Interstate 15.

Z-Train is now known as Pullman Palace Car Company, Limited [1].

The project was announced by Z-Train Limited LLC, a subsidiary of D2 Entertainment LLC, which partners in themed restaurants and attractions, museum “edu-tainment” features, hotels and casinos and other resorts. The company has worked on projects in the United Kingdom and Egypt and may be best known for its work on the Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth ship projects.

Five different classes of service would be offered – coach, business, first class, premium and private cars – each with a variety of onboard activities. Initially, Z-Train would operate daily except Tuesday, leaving Los Angeles at 10 a.m. and Las Vegas at 4 p.m.[1]

The Z-Train is not to be confused with the BNSF designation for intermodal trains carrying both containers & trailers, or with a potential competitor known as X-Train (Las Vegas Railway Express) [2]

On the Union Pacific Railroad, a train with (Z) designation references a premium intermodal train which is a high priority designation. Oftentimes train dispatchers line trains with lesser priority, such as manifest (M), intermodal (I) or rock (R) as well as others, into sidings or onto tracks other than the track currently being occupied by the high priority Z in order to expedite its movement. Z trains that travel over long distances are also known as Laser trains, which rarely stop to set out or pick up other cars and often travel from coast to coast.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Velotta, Richard (2010-05-07). "Low-speed train proposals clash". The Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  2. ^ X-Train website

External links[edit]