Zach Miller

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This article is about the Seattle Seahawks tight end. For the Chicago Bears tight end, see Zach Miller (tight end, born 1984).
Zach Miller
Zach Miller at 2012 Seahawks training camp.jpg
Miller at Seattle Seahawks training camp in August 2012
No. 86     Seattle Seahawks
Tight end
Personal information
Date of birth: (1985-12-11) December 11, 1985 (age 28)
Place of birth: Tempe, Arizona
Height: 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) Weight: 255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High school: Phoenix (AZ) Desert Vista
College: Arizona State
NFL Draft: 2007 / Round: 2 / Pick: 38
Debuted in 2007 for the Oakland Raiders
Career history
Roster status: Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 17, 2013
Receptions 322
Receiving yards 3,728
Receiving TDs 20
Stats at NFL.com

Zachary Joseph Miller (born December 11, 1985) is an American football tight end for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL). He grew up in Phoenix, Arizona and played college football for Arizona State University, where he received consensus All-American honors. He was selected in the second round of the 2007 NFL Draft by the Oakland Raiders. Miller earned a Super Bowl ring when the Seahawks won Super Bowl XLVIII.

Early years[edit]

Miller was born in Tempe, Arizona and attended Altadena Middle School as well as Desert Vista High School in nearby Phoenix. Miller played in the 2004 U.S. Army All-American Bowl, which is an annual all-star game for the nation's best high school football players.

College career[edit]

Miller enrolled at Arizona State University, where he played for the Arizona State Sun Devils football team from 2004 to 2006. In three seasons at Arizona State, he caught 144 passes for 1,512 yards, and 14 touchdown receptions. He was named a John Mackey Award finalist in 2006. The Sun Devils finished the season with a record of 10-3. Miller was an All-America selection by the AFCA and the Walter Camp Foundation in 2006.

Professional career[edit]

Oakland Raiders[edit]

Miller was projected to be a first round pick; however, his slightly disappointing performance at the combine caused him to be drafted early in the second round (38th overall), by the Oakland Raiders. Miller's successful college career drew high hopes for the Raider Nation. He was expected to be a reliable receiving threat and a solid blocker for the Raiders, after many disappointments at the team's tight end position, including Doug Jolley, Courtney Anderson and Randal Williams, and he fulfilled those expectations. Miller's blocking was a large factor in the Raiders' running game. He finished his rookie year with 44 catches for 444 yards and 3 touchdowns. Miller was added to the AFC 2011 Pro Bowl roster after Antonio Gates withdrew due to injury.[1] Miller led the Raiders in receiving in 2008, 2009, and 2010, totaling 60 receptions for 685 yards and a career-high five touchdowns during the 2010 campaign. His receptions total was the eighth-highest among NFL tight ends. Miller moved into third place on the Raiders career receiving list for tight ends with 226 receptions over four seasons. His career totals during his time with Oakland include 2,712 receiving yards and 12 touchdowns.

Seattle Seahawks[edit]

On August 2, 2011, Miller signed with the Seattle Seahawks on a 5 year, $34 million deal, $17 million of which is guaranteed. Head Coach Pete Carroll stated that Miller would become a great part of the offense. He finished off his first season with 25 receptions for 233 yards and no touchdowns catches. Miller was played more as a blocking tight end during the season.

In the 2012-13 NFL Playoffs, Miller was the leading receiver for the Seahawks in both games, and had 142 yards in the 30-28 loss to the Atlanta Falcons.

Miller earned a championship ring when the Seahawks won Super Bowl XLVIII following the 2013 season, in which they defeated the Denver Broncos 43-8.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Zach Miller replaces Antonio-Gates in Pro Bowl". nationalfootballpost.com. Retrieved 2010. 

External links[edit]