Zahedan

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For the administrative subdivision, see Zahedan County. For the city in Fars Province, see Zahedshahr.
Zahedan
زاهدان
city
IMAG0xxcv xcvxcvx103.jpg
Zahedan is located in Iran
Zahedan
Zahedan
Coordinates: 29°29′47″N 60°51′46″E / 29.49639°N 60.86278°E / 29.49639; 60.86278Coordinates: 29°29′47″N 60°51′46″E / 29.49639°N 60.86278°E / 29.49639; 60.86278
Country  Iran
Province Sistan and Baluchestan
County Zahedan
Bakhsh Central
Elevation 1,352 m (4,436 ft)
Population (2006)
 • Total 552,706
Time zone IRST (UTC+3:30)
 • Summer (DST) IRDT (UTC+4:30)
Area code(s) +98-54
Website http://portalzahedan.ir/

Zahedan (Persian: زاهدان‎, also Romanized as Zāhedān, Zahidan, and Zaidān; also known as Zāhedān-e Yek; formerly known as Dowzdāb, Duzdāb, and Duzdāp and renamed Zahedan by Reza Shah Pahlavi in the late 1920s [1])[2] is a city in and the capital of Sistan and Baluchestan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 552,706, in 109,488 families.[3] "Zahedan" is the plural of the Arabic word zahed meaning 'pious'.

Geography[edit]

Zahedan is located near Pakistan and Afghanistan, only about 41 km (25 mi) south of the tripoint of the borders of the three countries, at an altitude of 1,352 m (4,436 ft) above sea level and at a distance of 1,605 km (997 mi) from the Iranian capital of Tehran. The most famous tribes in Zahedan include the Keikha, Shahraki, Mir, and Birjandi.

Climate[edit]

Zahedan has a hot desert climate (Köppen climate classification BWh) with hot summers and cool winters. Precipitation is very low, and mostly falls in winter.

Climate data for Zahedan
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 27.0
(80.6)
28.0
(82.4)
32.2
(90)
37.0
(98.6)
40.4
(104.7)
43.0
(109.4)
42.0
(107.6)
43.0
(109.4)
40.0
(104)
36.0
(96.8)
30.2
(86.4)
28.0
(82.4)
43
(109.4)
Average high °C (°F) 14.0
(57.2)
16.5
(61.7)
21.9
(71.4)
27.5
(81.5)
32.5
(90.5)
36.2
(97.2)
37.0
(98.6)
35.6
(96.1)
32.3
(90.1)
27.7
(81.9)
21.7
(71.1)
16.3
(61.3)
26.6
(79.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) 6.4
(43.5)
9.2
(48.6)
14.5
(58.1)
20.0
(68)
24.7
(76.5)
28.3
(82.9)
29.3
(84.7)
27.1
(80.8)
22.7
(72.9)
17.8
(64)
11.9
(53.4)
7.9
(46.2)
18.32
(64.97)
Average low °C (°F) −0.5
(31.1)
2.5
(36.5)
7.4
(45.3)
12.1
(53.8)
15.9
(60.6)
18.6
(65.5)
19.8
(67.6)
17.2
(63)
12.4
(54.3)
8.1
(46.6)
3.1
(37.6)
0.5
(32.9)
9.8
(49.6)
Record low °C (°F) −22
(−8)
−14
(7)
−7
(19)
0.0
(32)
1.4
(34.5)
11.0
(51.8)
12.0
(53.6)
8.0
(46.4)
2.0
(35.6)
−4
(25)
−11
(12)
−16
(3)
−22
(−8)
Precipitation mm (inches) 19.3
(0.76)
21.1
(0.831)
13.6
(0.535)
9.5
(0.374)
3.9
(0.154)
0.4
(0.016)
0.8
(0.031)
0.9
(0.035)
0.2
(0.008)
1.8
(0.071)
3.4
(0.134)
7.2
(0.283)
82.1
(3.232)
Avg. rainy days 4.3 4.5 4.2 4.2 2.4 0.3 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.9 1.3 2.8 25.8
Avg. snowy days 0.7 0.4 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.3 1.5
 % humidity 54 50 42 36 29 24 23 24 25 31 40 49 35.6
Mean monthly sunshine hours 208.8 199.3 221.2 235.2 296.2 310.2 317.9 324.5 305.4 290.2 245.6 215.2 3,169.7
Source: NOAA (1961–1990) [4]
Zahedan Municipality

Education[edit]

University of Sistan and Baluchestan's Amphitheater in Zahedan.

Zahedan is the home of the Islamic Azad University, Zahedan,[5] the Zahedan University of Medical Sciences[6] and the University of Sistan and Baluchestan. Besides, the largest Sunni seminary, Darululoom Zahedan, is located in Zahedan. There are some other religious Sunni schools in the city and the vicinity.

Demographics and culture[edit]

Makki Mosque

The Demographics of Zahedan's inhabitants are largely ethnic Baluchi who speak the Baluchi language and Sistanis who speak Persian sistani and yazdi, khorasani. There are also smaller numbers of Brahuis and Pashtuns.

Zahedan lies east of the Kavir-e Loot desert. The city was part of the historic region of Sistan (Persian: سیستان), situated today on the borders of southeastern Iran and southwestern Afghanistan. One portion is part of the Iranian province of Sistan and Baluchestan. The other portion is part of the Nimruz Province of Afghanistan.

The name Sistan comes from 'Sakastan', of which Sistan was once the westernmost part. The Sakas that were once native to Sistan were driven to the Punjab during the Arsacid era (63 BCE-220 CE). The Saffarids (861–1003 CE), one of the early Iranian dynasties of the Islamic era, were originally rulers of Sistan. In the Shahnameh, Sistan is also referred to as Zabulistan, after Zabol, a city in the region. In Ferdowsi's epic, Zabulistan is in turn described to be the homeland of the mythological hero-king Rostam.

Zahedan and the area of Sistan has a very strong connection with Zoroastrianism and during Sassanid times Lake Hamun was one of two pilgrimage sites for followers of that religion. In Zoroastrian religion, the lake is the keeper of Zoroaster's seed and just before the final renovation of the world, three maidens will enter the lake, each then giving birth to the saoshyants who will be the saviours of mankind at the final renovation of the world. The most famous archaeological site in Sistan is on Kuh-e Khwajeh, a hill rising up as an island in the middle of Lake Hamun.

Zahedan is the main economic center of the region and home to many small- and medium-scale industries. Its main products include cotton textiles, woven and hand-knotted rugs, ceramics, processed foods, livestock feed, processed hides, milled rice, brick, reed mats and baskets.

Zahedan is a centre for Sunnism in Baluchistan. The Makki mosque and its madrasa play an important role in Baluchistan's society. Shaikh Abdolhamid Ismaeelzahi is the main and most influential religious and Sunni community leader in Iran that is heading Makki mosque and its institutions. Zahedan also has a Friday mosque for Shi'ite and a Jame mosque, where many members of the community gather to worship on Fridays. The city also has a Sikh gurdwara. A colorful bazaar, Rasouli Bazaar, can also be found in the city, where Baluchi and Pashtun traders intermingle. About 100 km (62 mi) south of Zahedan is an intermittently active volcano, Taftan, which rises abruptly 4,042 m (13,261 ft) from the surrounding plain.

Although the surrounding area has many ancient sites, Zahedan itself developed mainly in the 20th century. Before being chosen as the provincial administrative center in the 1930s, Zahedan was a small village. Its population reached 17,500 by 1956 and increased more than fivefold to 93,000 by 1976. After 1980 large numbers of refugees fleeing the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan helped triple the population of Zahedan to more than 281,000 by 1986, a number which has since doubled again.

Etymology[edit]

Before the rise of Reza Shah Pahlavi in 1923, the city of Zahedan was known as Dozz-aap. That name was in turn derived from the Persian Dozd-aab, literally meaning "water stealing." This is the name given to a sandy land formation that quickly swallows up any water that falls on it, be it rain or irrigation water.

The name was changed to Zahedan by the Iranian Academy of Culture (the Farhangistan), set up during the reign of Reza Shah Pahlavi in the 1930s, which changed a myriad of toponyms in Iran. But the name is not just a neologism. Instead, it is taken from the medieval city of Zaidan, whose ruins stretch for miles on both banks of the lower Helmand river near its inland delta in Iranian Sistan (see, Henry Savage Landor, Across Coveted Lands, London 1902, chapter XXI). Although the imposing ruins of medieval Zaidan (destroyed by Tamerlane in the late 14th century) are tens of miles away from modern Zahidan, somehow it was seen fit to rename Dozdab after this prestigious historic city. A folk etymology maintains, however improbably, that the current name, Zahedan ("Sages," or "pious people" in Persian) was given to the city upon its visit by Reza Shah. The story maintains that upon arrival in the city, the Shah noticed many Sikhs among the inhabitants of the city. By their traditional appearances, the Shah misinterpreted the inhabitants as being devout Muslims. The Sikhs were not many, but occupied in the trade business and therefore highly visible in the city.

Street view

Sports[edit]

See also: Sport in Iran

In April 2008 the 70 billion IRR (about 2.5 million USD) Zahedan Stadium was built with a seating capacity of 15,000 people. It was inaugurated on 18 April 2008 with a friendly football game between Honarmandan (Actors) versus a local team.

Economy[edit]

See also: Economy of Iran

Transport[edit]

Highway 95 links Zahedan to Tehran and Mashhad in the north and the port of Bandar Chabahar on the Sea of Oman in the south, and Highway 84 to the Pakistani city of Quetta in the east and to Kerman in the west.

For many years, a broad gauge railway line has extended from Zahedan to Quetta in Pakistan.

More recently, a standard gauge line was completed from Zahedan to Kerman in central Iran, linking Zahedan with the rest of the Iranian rail network.[7] This was the result of an 18 May 2007, MOU for rail cooperation that was signed by Pakistan and Iran under which the line was to be completed by December 2008.[8] The line was officially completed with an opening ceremony on 19 June 2009.[9] This makes Zahedan the location of the break of gauge between the Islamic Republic of Iran Railway's standard gauge tracks and Pakistan Railway's Indian gauge tracks.

Zahedan is also served by Zahedan International Airport.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Skrine, Clarmont (1962). World War In Iran. Constable & Company, Ltd. Pg 68
  2. ^ Zahedan can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering "-3088799" in the "Unique Feature Id" form, and clicking on "Search Database".
  3. ^ "Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)" (Excel). Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original on 2011-11-11. 
  4. ^ "Zahedan Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved December 19, 2012. 
  5. ^ Iauzah.ac.ir
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Dr John Stubbs (1 January 2007). "Closing the gap from Bam to Zahedan". Railway Gazette International. 
  8. ^ "Intelligence". Railway Gazette International. 1 July 2007. 
  9. ^ Zahedan

External links[edit]