Zeina Awad

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Zeina Awad
Born Zeina Awad
Occupation Journalist, Al Jazeera English[1]
Website
www.zeinaawad.com

Zeina Awad co-hosts Fault Lines,[2] Al Jazeera English’s flagship current affairs programme about the Americas. Awad says she believes that Fault Lines strives to identify and patch information gaps by "asking the tough questions" of the countries and people in power.[3]

Awad’s Fault Lines coverage brought her to India where she reported on US pharmaceutical companies conducting clinical research abroad.[2][4][5] She also traveled to Puerto Rico, projected to be the world’s slowest growing economy, to analyze the economic policies imposed on its people.[4][6] She rounds out this season's coverage with an exploration of the growing gap between the wealthiest 1% of Americans and the rest of society.[7]

Background[edit]

Prior to joining the Fault Lines team, Awad covered some of the Middle East and Africa’s most important stories for Al Jazeera English's People and Power, including the rise of Islamism in Lebanon’s Palestinian refugee camps, Iraq’s forgotten refugees, and the underground world of Zimbabwean human trafficking. Based in the Middle East, Awad traveled throughout the region extensively, covering news stories ranging from the Gaza war[8] to Lebanon’s violent unrest. Awad's reporting also brought her to Africa, where her coverage spans the continent and focuses on issues such as the Darfur conflict and the Zimbabwean exodus.[9] She has reported from Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan, the Occupied Palestinian Territories,[10] South Africa, Kenya, Morocco,[11] Algeria, Canada,[12] the US and India. Awad has interviewed numerous world leaders, including former Nigerian President Obasanjo, Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh,[13][14] veteran Lebanese politician Walid Jumblatt and members of the US Congress, as well as Arab and African ministers.

Before joining Al Jazeera English, Awad was a producer for the BBC’s HARDtalk and Panorama programmes (2004–2006), as well as Al Jazeera Arabic (2003–2004) and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2000–2002). She earned a Master’s Degree in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics in November 2003.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Collins, Laura (9 August 2011). "Reporting on war: Women in the line of fire". The National. 
  2. ^ a b Awad, Zeina (1 August 2011). U.S. Pharmaceutical Companies Testing Drugs on India’s Poor. Interview with Viji Sundaram. New American Media. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  3. ^ "Meet presenter Zeina Awad". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 11 July 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Ricchiardi, Sherry (March–April 2011). "The Al Jazeera Effect". American Journalism Review. 
  5. ^ "Outsourced: Clinical trials overseas". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 11 July 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  6. ^ "Puerto Rico: The fiscal experiment". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 27 June 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  7. ^ "The top 1%". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 2 August 2011. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  8. ^ Pintak, Lawrence (Winter 2009). "Gaza: Of media wars and borderless journalism". Arab Media & Society. 
  9. ^ "Crossing Over". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 11&15 July 2007. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  10. ^ "Gazans fleeced in investment scam". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 5 December 2009. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  11. ^ "Moroccan Diary". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 5 September 2007. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  12. ^ "Battle for Minority Vote in Canada". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 27 April 2011. Retrieved 22 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "Interview with Ismail Haniyeh". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 16 December 2009. Retrieved 16 August 2011. 
  14. ^ "Interview with Ismail Haniyeh, Part 2". Fault Lines. Al Jazeera English. 16 December 2009. Retrieved 16 August 2011.