FC Zenit Saint Petersburg

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Zenit
Logo: FK "Zenit", St. Petersburg
Full name Футбольный клуб Зенит
(Football Club Zenit)
Nickname(s) Sine-Belo-Golubye (The Blue-White-Sky Blues)
Zenitchiki (The Anti-aircraft Gunners)
Bomzhi (The Tramps)
Founded 30 May 1925; 89 years ago (1925-05-30)
Ground Petrovsky Stadium
Ground Capacity 21,405
Owner Gazprom
Chairman Aleksandr Dyukov
Manager André Villas-Boas
League Russian Premier League
2013–14 2nd
Website Club home page
Current season

Football Club Zenit (Russian: Футбо́льный клуб «Зени́т» [fʊdˈbolʲnɨj klup zʲɪˈnʲit], Zenith), also known as Zenit Saint Petersburg, is a Russian football club from the city of Saint Petersburg. Founded in 1925 (or in 1914, according to some Russian sources), the club plays in the Russian Premier League. Zenit were the 2007, 2010 and 2011–12 champions of the Russian Premier League and the winners of both the 2007–08 UEFA Cup and the 2008 UEFA Super Cup.

History[edit]

Before Zenit[edit]

Zenit's history is tightly connected with the political history of Saint Petersburg, Russia (also called "Petrograd" and "Leningrad" at times in its history). In 1897, the first football match in Russia was held in Saint Petersburg on Vasilievsky Island, an unofficial game between the local English team "Ostrov" and the local Russian team "Petrograd," which the English team won, 6–0. The players of those local teams were amateurs and loosely associated with each other. At the same time, several formal football clubs were founded in Saint Petersburg, mainly around large industrial companies. Players' membership was unofficial and very loose, however, sometimes allowing the same players to play for several different teams during the same season.

Formation of Zenit[edit]

The original team Zenit stemmed from several football teams, which changed names and owners many times during the Soviet era after the Revolution of 1917. Powerful political forces manipulated the careers of individual players as well as the fate of the whole team. The club was renamed several times, and its owners and leaders were under political pressure for many decades. The origins of Zenit date back to the beginning of the 20th century, to several predecessor teams in Saint Petersburg that were playing locally. The oldest documented predecessor of Zenit was team "Murzinka", founded in 1914, which played in the same Obukhovsky stadium from 1914 until 1924, when the team became to be called "Bolshevik" (the new name for Obukhovsky industry and its stadium). The team and stadium survived the drama of World War I, the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, and the Russian Civil War of 1918–1922.

In 1925, another predecessor team of Zenit was formed, of workers from the Leningradsky Metallichesky Zavod (Leningrad Metal Plant); they were called the "Stalinets" in the 1930s. (Stalinets translates literally to English as "Stalinists"; however, in Russian, the name is a play on words as stal means "steel" in that language.) Historians documented that both predecessor teams of Zenit were playing independently until their official merger at the end of 1939. The Stalinets were not the same team named Zenit that took part in the 1938 USSR championship. The current name of FC Zenit was registered in 1936, as Bolshevik became part of the Zenit sports society and was renamed, three years before the Stalinets merged with it. In 1939, during the rule of Joseph Stalin, Leningradsky Metallichesky Zavod became part of the military industry and its sports teams, players, and managers were transferred to the Zenit sports society. FC Zenit was ordered to take in members of the "Stalinets" metallurgical workers' team after the end of the 1939 season.

Zenit in the Soviet League[edit]

FC Zenit won their first honours in 1944, claiming the war-time USSR Cup after defeating CSKA in the well-attended final. The club was always adored in Leningrad,[citation needed] but wasn't able to make much of an impact in the Soviet League. In 1967, Zenit finished last but were saved from relegation because the Soviet leadership decided it wouldn't be prudent to relegate a Leningrad team during the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution, which occurred in the city. Composer Dmitry Shostakovich and film star Kirill Lavrov were well known as ardent supporters of Zenit, a passion that is reflected in their attendance of many games.[citation needed] FC Zenit won the bronze medal in 1980. They reached Soviet Cup Final and won the Soviet League title in 1984. In 1985, Zenit beat the Soviet Cup holder in the Soviet Super Cup (also called the Season Cup).

Zenit in the Russian League[edit]

The LOMO optical plant took up the ownership of the team after the war.[vague] In 1990, FC Zenit were re-registered as an independent city-owned professional club, After being relegated in the first year of the Russian League (1992), Zenit returned to the top flight in 1996 and has been decent since. They claimed the 1999 Russian Cup, finished third in the League in 2001, made the Cup final in 2002, became the runners-up in the Premier League, and won the Russian Premier League Cup in 2003. In December 2005, Gazprom took a controlling stake in the club.[1] The deal was announced by Valentina Matviyenko, the Saint Petersburg governor. Gazprom bought the majority of the club and invested over $100 million, buying new players and building the new stadium.

Andrey Arshavin, one of the best players in Zenit history

Although Zenit reached the quarterfinal of the UEFA Cup in 2006, a mediocre start to the league season led to the summer replacement of coach Vlastimil Petržela. Since July 2006, Zenit have been under Dick Advocaat.[2] Advocaat worked together with his Assistant Manager, former Netherlands National Youth Team coach Cor Pot. Zenit won the 2007 Russian Premier League, their best league achievement since winning the USSR Championship in 1984. That allowed them to compete in the group stage of the Champions League 2008–09.

In 2008, Zenit won the Russian Super Cup and reached the quarter-final of the UEFA Cup for the second time in their history. In the first leg of the quarter-final away game against Bayer Leverkusen from Germany, the team achieved a 4–1 victory. They qualified for the semi-finals of the competition for the first time in their history, despite a 1–0 home loss to Bayer Leverkusen in the second leg, and were drawn to play further German opposition in the semi-final, Bayern Munich, considered the top team remaining.[3] A battling performance in the first leg of the semi-final earned Zenit a 1–1 draw away against Bayern Munich. In the second leg at home, Zenit won 4–0, defeating Bayern 5–1 on aggregate and going through to the UEFA Cup final for the first time in the club's history, where they met the Scottish team Rangers at the City of Manchester Stadium, Manchester on 14 May. Zenit won 2–0, with goals from Igor Denisov in the 72nd minute and Konstantin Zyryanov in stoppage time, to lift the club's first ever UEFA Cup. Andrei Arshavin was named man of the match.[4]

On 29 August 2008, at the Stade Louis II in Monaco, Zenit defeated Manchester United 2–1 in the 2008 UEFA Super Cup, becoming the first Russian side to win the trophy. Pavel Pogrebnyak scored the first goal and Danny scored the second. Danny was named for man of the match in his debut for Zenit.[5] In the UEFA Champions League 2008–09 group stage Zenit was grouped with Real Madrid, Juventus, and BATE in Group H, which by some was marked as the group of death. Unfortunately the team finished in third place in Group H, behind Juventus and Real Madrid and was unable to progress to the knockout phase of the competition. However this position was good enough to earn the club a place in the 2008–09 UEFA Cup last 32 where the team faced Stuttgart of Germany for a place in the last 16 of the competition. This allowed the club a shot to defend the trophy that they won the previous season in Manchester. However after defeating Stuttgart on away goals, they went on to lose 2–1 over two legs against Udinese.

Spalletti era[edit]

Zenit against Bayern Munich in 2011

Luciano Spalletti signed a contract with Zenit in December 2009, with Italian coaches Daniele Baldini, Marco Domenichini, and Alberto Bartali also joining the Russian club. The Board of Zenit wanted him to return the Russian Premier League title, win the Russian Cup, and go through the group stage of the Champions League in his first year.

Zenit won the Russian Cup on 16 May 2010, beating FC Sibir Novosibirsk in the final (having beaten Volga Tver in the quarterfinal and Amkar Perm in the semifinal). After 16 games in the 2010 Premier League, with 12 wins and four draws, under Spalletti Zenit have obtained 40 points. This set a new Russian Premier League record for most points won at that stage of the campaign. In the summer transfer window of 2010, Spalletti made his first signings: forward Aleksandr Bukharov and midfielder Sergei Semak came from Rubin Kazan; defenders Aleksandar Lukovic from Udinese and Bruno Alves from FC Porto.

On 25 August 2010, Zenit lost its first game under Spalletti to AJ Auxerre and failed to advance to the Champions League group stage, but Zenit moved on to play in UEFA Europa League. On 3 October 2010, Zenit beat Spartak Nalchik to set another Russian Premier League record for most consecutive games going undefeated, with 21 games since the start of the league season. On 27 October 2010, Zenit suffered its first defeat of the season at the hands of rival club Spartak Moscow, seven games short of finishing the championship undefeated. On 14 November, Zenit won FC Rostov and 2 games prior to the end of the season won the championship title. This champions title became the first in Spalletti's career.

Zenit went through to knockout stage of the 2010–11 UEFA Europa League in first place. In the Round of 16 stage, Zenit beat BSC Young Boys. On 6 March 2011, Zenit won against PFC CSKA Moscow in the Russian Super Cup, it became the third Russian trophy Zenit won under Spalletti. On 17 March 2011 Zenit were knocked out of the UEFA Europa League, losing to FC Twente 2–3 on aggregate in the quarter final stage.

In the 2011–12 Champions League, Zenit started in the group stage drawn into Group G alongside FC Porto, Shakhtar Donetsk, and APOEL. On 6 December 2011, Zenit finished the group stage in second place and for the first time in club's history qualified for the spring knockout phase of Champions League. In 1/8 stage Zenit were drawn with S.L. Benfica of Portugal. In the first leg against Benfica, Zenit won 3–2 at home through two goals from Roman Shirokov and one from Sergei Semak. In the second leg in Lisbon, however, Zenit lost 2–0 and were eliminated from the competition.

In April 2012, Zenit won their second straight Russian Championship after beating Dynamo Moscow.[6]

Stadiums[edit]

Main article: Petrovsky Stadium

Zenit's home ground is now the Petrovsky Stadium in Saint Petersburg. Petrovsky Stadium has a capacity of 21,500.[7] In 2007, the club's former home base at the Kirov Stadium was demolished, to be replaced with a new stadium built for Zenit, Gazprom Arena. The new football stadium in Saint Petersburg is currently under construction. Once completed, it will host Zenit's home matches. The stadium will have a capacity of 69,000.[8]

Achievements[edit]

Domestic competitions[edit]

1984, 2007, 2010, 2011–12
1944, 1999, 2010
1984, 2008, 2011
2003
  • Runners-up (1): 1986
1980
  • Runners-up: none

International competitions[edit]

2008[11]
  • Runners-up: none
2008[12]
  • Runners-up: none

Other[edit]

  • Match World Cup
    • Winners (1) : 2012
  • Runners-up: none

League and cup history[edit]

Soviet Union[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe
1936 2nd 3 6 9 9 13
1936 2nd 6 7 6 13 12 Round of 16
1937 2nd 4 12 22 18 25 Round of 128
1938 1st 14 25 7 10 8 38 57 24 Round of 16
1939 1st 11 26 7 7 12 30 46 21 Runner-up
1940 1st 10 24 6 6 12 37 42 18
1944 Winner
1945 1st 6 8 7 7 35 31 23 Semi-final
1946 1st 9 22 5 5 12 22 45 15 Round of 16
1947 1st 6 24 10 2 12 35 49 22 Quarter-final
1948 1st 13 26 4 9 13 29 48 17 Round of 16
1949 1st 5 34 17 8 9 48 48 42 Quarter-final
1950 1st 6 36 19 5 12 70 59 43 Quarter-final
1951 1st 7 28 10 8 10 36 40 28 Round of 16
1952 1st 7 13 6 2 5 20 21 14 Quarter-final
1953 1st 5 20 11 1 8 25 21 23 Round of 16
1954 1st 7 24 8 7 9 27 26 23 Semi-final
1955 1st 8 22 5 8 9 23 36 18 Round of 16
1956 1st 9 22 4 11 7 27 43 19
1957 1st 10 22 4 7 11 23 41 15 Round of 16
1958 1st 4 22 9 8 5 41 32 26 Round of 16
1959 1st 8 22 8 4 10 29 38 20
1960 1st 15 30 14 5 11 47 37 33 Round of 32
1961 1st 13 32 12 8 12 50 52 32 Semi-final
1962 1st 11 32 11 7 14 53 42 29 Round of 32
1963 1st 6 38 14 17 7 45 32 45 Round of 32
1964 1st 11 32 9 9 14 30 35 27 Round of 16
1965 1st 9 32 10 12 10 32 32 32 Round of 32
1966 1st 16 36 10 8 18 35 54 28 Round of 16
1967 1st 19 36 6 9 21 28 63 21 Round of 32
1968 1st 11 38 10 14 14 35 49 34 Round of 32
1969 1st 9 26 6 9 11 21 34 21 Round of 16
1970 1st 14 32 10 7 15 30 40 27 Quarter-final
1971 1st 13 30 8 10 12 29 32 26 Quarter-final
1972 1st 7 30 11 11 8 44 30 33 Quarter-final
1973 1st 11 30 9 12 9 33 35 21 Round of 16
1974 1st 7 30 8 15 7 36 41 31 Round of 16
1975 1st 14 30 7 10 13 27 42 24 Round of 16
1976 1st 13 15 4 5 6 14 15 13
1976 1st 5 15 6 4 5 22 16 16 Round of 16
1977 1st 10 30 8 12 10 34 33 28 Semi-final
1978 1st 10 30 9 8 13 31 46 26 Quarter-final
1979 1st 10 34 11 9 14 41 45 30 Group stage
1980 1st 3 34 16 10 8 51 42 42 Group stage
1981 1st 15 34 9 10 15 33 43 28 Round of 16
1982 1st 7 34 12 9 13 44 41 33 Group stage UC First round
1983 1st 4 34 15 11 8 42 32 40 Semi-final
1984 1st 1 34 19 9 6 60 32 47 Runner-up
1985 1st 6 34 14 7 13 48 38 35 Semi-final
1986 1st 4 30 12 9 9 44 36 33 Semi-final ECC Second round
1987 1st 14 30 7 10 13 25 37 24 Round of 16
1988 1st 6 30 11 9 10 35 34 31 Round of 16 UC First round
1989 1st 16 30 5 9 16 24 48 19 Round of 16
1990 2nd 18 38 8 14 16 35 41 30 Round of 32 UC Second round
1991 2nd 18 42 11 14 17 44 50 36 Round of 32

Russia[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Cup Europe Top scorer
(league)
Head coach
1992 1st 16 30 10 8 12 39 45 28 Russia Kulik – 13 Russia Melnikov
1993 2nd,
"Centre"
2 38 25 8 5 87 33 58 Round of 32 Russia Kulik – 36 Russia Melnikov
1994 2nd 13 42 14 12 16 44 49 40 Round of 64 Russia Kulik – 9 Russia Melnikov
1995 3 42 24 5 13 68 42 77 Round of 32 Russia Kulik – 19 Russia Sadyrin
1996 1st 10 34 13 4 17 32 37 43 Round of 32 Russia Kulik – 11 Russia Sadyrin
1997 8 34 13 10 11 28 29 49 Semifinal Ukraine Gorshkov – 5 Russia Byshovets
1998 5 30 12 11 7 42 25 47 Round of 16 Russia Panov – 8
Ukraine Maksimyuk – 8
Russia Byshovets
Russia Davydov
1999 8 30 9 12 9 36 34 39 Winner Ukraine Popovich – 7 Russia Davydov
2000 7 30 13 8 9 38 26 47 Round of 32 UC
IC
1st round
Runner-up
Ukraine Popovich – 10 Russia Davydov
Russia Morozov
2001 3 30 16 8 6 52 35 56 Round of 32 Ukraine Popovich – 7 Russia Morozov
2002 10 30 8 9 13 36 42 33 Runner-up Russia Kerzhakov – 14 Russia Morozov
Russia Biryukov
Russia Rappoport
2003 2 30 16 8 6 48 32 56 Round of 16 UC 1st round Russia Kerzhakov – 13 Czech Republic Petržela
2004 4 30 17 5 8 55 37 56 Round of 16 Russia Kerzhakov – 18 Czech Republic Petržela
2005 6 30 13 10 7 45 26 49 Semifinals UC Group stage Russia Arshavin – 9 Czech Republic Petržela
2006 4 30 13 11 6 42 30 50 Semifinals UC Quarterfinals Russia Arshavin – 7 Czech Republic Petržela
Czech Republic Borovička
Netherlands Advocaat
2007 1 30 18 7 5 53 32 61 Quarterfinals Russia Pogrebnyak – 11 Netherlands Advocaat
2008 5 30 12 12 6 59 37 48 Quarterfinals UC Winner Turkey Tekke – 8 Netherlands Advocaat
2009 3 30 15 9 6 48 27 54 Round of 32 UCL
UC
Group stage
Round of 16
Turkey Tekke – 8 Netherlands Advocaat
Russia Davydov
2010 1 30 20 8 2 61 21 68 Winner EL 1st round Russia Kerzhakov – 13 Italy Spalletti
2011–12 1 44 24 16 4 85 40 88 Quarterfinals UCL Round of 16 Russia Kerzhakov – 23 Italy Spalletti
2012–13 2 30 18 8 4 52 25 62 Semifinals UCL
EL
Group stage
Round of 16
Russia Kerzhakov – 10 Italy Spalletti
2013–14 2 30 19 6 5 63 32 63 Fifth Round UCL Round of 16 Brazil Hulk – 17 Portugal Villas-Boas

League results[edit]

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

As of 25 June 2014.[13]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Russia GK Yury Lodygin
2 Russia DF Aleksandr Anyukov (captain)
4 Italy DF Domenico Criscito
5 Russia MF Aleksandr Ryazantsev
6 Belgium DF Nicolas Lombaerts (1st vice-captain)
7 Brazil FW Hulk
10 Russia FW Andrey Arshavin
11 Russia FW Aleksandr Kerzhakov
13 Portugal DF Luís Neto
14 Slovakia DF Tomáš Hubočan
16 Russia GK Vyacheslav Malafeev
17 Russia MF Oleg Shatov
19 Russia DF Igor Smolnikov
No. Position Player
20 Russia MF Viktor Fayzulin
21 Spain MF Javi Garcia
23 Venezuela FW Salomón Rondón
24 Argentina DF Ezequiel Garay
28 Belgium MF Axel Witsel
33 Serbia DF Milan Rodić
35 Portugal MF Danny (2nd vice-captain)
44 Ukraine MF Anatoliy Tymoshchuk
57 Russia DF Dzhamaldin Khodzhaniyazov
71 Russia GK Yegor Baburin
77 Montenegro FW Luka Đorđević
99 Russia MF Ivan Solovyov

For recent transfers, see List of Russian football transfers summer 2013.

Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Argentina DF Cristian Ansaldi (at Atlético Madrid until 30 June 2015)
Lithuania MF Ovidijus Verbickas (at FK Atlantas until 31 December 2014)
Russia MF Pavel Mogilevets (at FC Rubin Kazan until 31 August 2014)

Youth team squad[edit]

As of 2 September 2013.
Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
18 Russia MF Konstantin Zyryanov
40 Russia MF Pavel Barbashov
41 Russia DF Andrei Yakovlev
42 Russia MF Danila Davidenko
43 Russia FW Pavel Nazimov
45 Russia DF Maksim Petrov
46 Armenia MF Zakhar Dilanyan
47 Russia MF Valeri Yaroshenko
48 Russia FW Aleksei Gasilin
49 Russia FW Aleksei Gudkov
50 Russia DF Maksim Karpov
51 Russia GK Maksim Rudakov
52 Russia DF Andrei Ivanov
53 Russia MF Ivan Ivanidi
54 Russia MF Aleksandr Zakarlyuka
55 Russia DF Konstantin Lobov
56 Russia DF Kirill Kostin
58 Russia DF Ilya Zuyev
59 Russia FW Aleksei Yegorov
60 Russia MF Yevgeni Serenkov
61 Russia GK Anton Tsvetkov
62 Russia FW Stepan Rebenko
63 Russia FW Anton Solovyev
64 Russia MF Elvin Badalov
65 Russia MF Danila Yashchuk
67 Russia DF Dmitri Chertishchev
No. Position Player
68 Russia MF Vyacheslav Zinkov
69 Russia MF Sergei Filatenko
70 Russia FW Dmitri Bogayev
72 Russia DF Stepan Zhalobkov
73 Russia MF Pavel Osipov
75 Armenia MF Artyom Simonyan
76 Russia FW Pavel Kireyenko
78 Russia DF Dmitri Chistyakov
79 Russia MF Konstantin Troyanov
80 Russia GK Mikhail Mzhelskiy
81 Russia MF Maksim Batov
82 Russia FW Aleksei Makarov
83 Russia GK Igor Obukhov
84 Russia DF Mikhail Kovalenko
86 Russia DF Yevgeni Alferov
87 Russia MF Aleksei Kayukov
88 Russia FW Artyom Popov
89 Russia FW Yevgeni Markov
90 Russia MF Ramil Sheydayev
92 Russia FW Pavel Dolgov
93 Russia MF Aleksei Panfilov
94 Russia MF Aleksei Yevseyev
95 Russia GK Aleksandr Vasyutin
96 Russia DF Ilya Kubyshkin
97 Russia MF Dmitri Khodakovskiy
98 Russia FW Vladislav Yefimov

Reserve squad[edit]

Zenit's reserve squad played professionally as Zenit-2 (Russian Second League in 1993, Russian Second Division from 1998 to 2000) and Zenit-d (Russian Third League from 1994 to 1997). Another team that was founded as Lokomotiv-Zenit-2 played as Zenit-2 in the Russian Second Division from 2001 to 2008. By 2008, there was no relation between that team and FC Zenit. Another farm club called FC Smena-Zenit debuted in the Russian Second Division in 2009, taking the spot of the former FC Zenit-2. FC Smena-Zenit was dissolved after the 2009 season because it did not fulfill Zenit's initial expectations. Zenit-2 reentered professional football in the 2013-14 season in the Russian Professional Football League.

Team captains[edit]

Name Years
Russia Oleg Dmitriyev 1993–94
Russia Vladimir Kulik 1995–96
Ukraine Yuriy Vernydub 1997–2000
Russia Andrey Kobelev 2000–01
Russia Aleksei Igonin 2001–03
Russia Vladislav Radimov 2003–07
Russia Andrey Arshavin 2007
Norway Erik Hagen 2007
Ukraine Anatoliy Tymoshchuk 2007–09
Russia Vyacheslav Malafeev 2009
Russia Aleksandr Anyukov 2009–12
Russia Vyacheslav Malafeev 2012
Portugal Danny 2012–13
Russia Roman Shirokov 2013
Russia Aleksandr Anyukov 2014–

Club officials[edit]

Board of directors[edit]

Position Name
President Alexander Dyukov
General Director Maxim Mitrofanov
Sporting Director Dietmar Beiersdorfer
Deputy General Directors Dmitri Mankin
Deputy General Directors Ilya Gerkus
Deputy General Directors Rosteslav Leontyev
Deputy General Directors Zhanna Dembo
Deputy General Directors Yury Andreevich
Director of the "Smena" study-practice complex Vasily Kostrovsky

Source: fc-zenit.ru

Source: fc-zenit.ru