LZ 2

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"LZII" redirects here. LZII may also refer to Led Zeppelin II.
LZ 2
LZ 2 Flug 1905.jpg
Role Experimental airship
National origin Germany
Manufacturer Luftschiffbau Zeppelin
Designer Ludwig Dürr
First flight 17 January 1906
Number built 1

The LZ 2 was a German experimental airship constructed by Luftschiffbau Zeppelin and first flown in 1906. It was the true ancestor of later Zeppelin airship designs. The major mistake made by Kübler in the design of the LZ 1 were not repeated: the designer, Ludwig Dürr, who was to head the design of all subsequent Zeppelins, used triangular-section girders instead of Kübler's flat girders, and elevators instead of the lead weight to control pitch. [1] [2] Though the life of the LZ 2 was brief, consisting of only two flights, its near sister ship, the LZ 3, which first flew on 9 October 1906 and was purchased by the German Army and operated as the Z I until 1913.[3] Before being purchased by the Army, LZ 3 made many flights and carried a number of influential passengers, including the German Crown Prince. [4]

Specifications[edit]

Data from Robinson 1973 pp.29-30

General characteristics

  • Length: 126.19 m (414 ft 0 in)
  • Diameter: 11.75 m (38 ft 6 in)
  • Volume: 10,370 m3 (366,200 ft3)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Daimler piston engines, 63 kW (84 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 40 km/h (25 mph)
  • Range: 1,100 km (680 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 850 m (2,800 ft)

References[edit]

  • Stephenson, Charles (2004). Zeppelins: German Airships 1900-40. Oxford: Osprey. 
  1. ^ Robinson, Douglas H. (1973). Giants in the Sky. Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 29. ISBN 0-295-95249-0. 
  2. ^ Brooks, Peter W. (1992). Zeppelin: Rigid Airships 1893-1940. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press. pp. 34–35. ISBN 1-56098-228-4. 
  3. ^ Brooks, Peter W. (1992). Zeppelin: Rigid Airships 1893-1940. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press. p. 34. ISBN 1-56098-228-4. 
  4. ^ Robinson, Douglas H. (1973). Giants in the Sky. Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 34. ISBN 0-295-95249-0.