Zev Vilnay

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Zev Vilnay in 1935

Zev Vilnay (Hebrew: זאב וילנאי‎, 1900–1988) was an Israeli geographer, author and lecturer.

Biography[edit]

Zev Vilnay was born Volf Vilensky in Kishinev. He moved to Palestine with his parents at the age of six and grew up in Haifa. He served as a military topographer in the Haganah, and later in the Israel Defense Forces.[1] Vilnay and his wife Esther lived in Jerusalem. Their son, Matan Vilnai is a member of the Knesset [2] and Israel's deputy minister of defense. Their eldest son is Prof. Oren Vilnay, expert in structural Engineering who established a new department of Civil Engineering in Ben Gurion University.

Land of Israel studies[edit]

He was a pioneer in the sphere of outdoor hiking and touring in Israel. Vilnay lectured widely on Israeli geography, ethnography, history and folklore.[1] His Guide to Israel was published in 27 editions[3] and translated into many languages.[4]

In the 1974 edition of his guide, Vilnay describes how he helped bring back to Israel the boat of a British naval officer, Thomas Howard Molyneux, who sailed the Jordan River from Lake Kinneret to the Dead Sea to map the region in the 19th century.[5]

Awards[edit]

Published works in English[edit]

  • Legends of Palestine (1932)
  • The Guide to Israel (first published in 1955)
  • The Holy Land in Old Prints and Maps (1965)
  • The New Israel Atlas: Bible to Present Day (1968)
  • The Changing Face of Acco
  • Legends of Jerusalem (3 volumes)
  • Legends of Judea and Samaria
  • The Vilnay Guide to Israel: A new Millennium Edition (2 volumes) (1999), written and edited after his death and according to his instructions by Oren and Rachel Vilnay

Published works in Hebrew[edit]

  • Entziklopediya Liyidiat Haaretz (3 volumes) (1956)
  • Yerushalayim (2 volumes) (1960–62, 1970)
  • Eretz Yisrael Betmunot Atikot (1961)
  • Matzevot Kodesh Be'eretz Yisrael (1963)
  • Tel Aviv-Jaffa (1965)
  • Yehudah Veshomron (1968)
  • Sinai, Avar Vehoveh (1969)
  • Golan Vehermon (1970)
  • Ariel – Entziklopediya Lidiyat HaAretz (10 volumes) (1976–82)

See also[edit]

References[edit]