Zhejiang cuisine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dongpo pork, a notable dish in Zhejiang cuisine

Zhejiang cuisine (Chinese, p Zhècài) is one of the 8 Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine. It derives from the traditional ways of cooking in Zhejiang province in China, south of Shanghai and around the former Chinese capital of Hangzhou. In general, Zhejiang-style food is not greasy but has a fresh and soft flavour with a mellow fragrance.[1]

Styles[edit]

Zhejiang cuisine consists of at least three styles, each originating from a city in the province:[2]

  • Hangzhou style, characterised by rich variations and the utilisation of bamboo shoots. It is served by restaurants such as the Dragon Well Manor.[3]
  • Shaoxing style, specialising in poultry and freshwater fish.
  • Ningbo style, specialising in seafood, with emphasis on freshness and salty dishes.

Some sources also include the Wenzhou style as a separate subdivision (due to its proximity to Fujian), characterised as the greatest source of seafood as well as poultry and livestock.[4]

Notable dishes[edit]

About half the dishes on a Hangzhou menu contain bamboo shoots, which add a tender element to the food.[citation needed]

Ningbo cuisine is regarded as rather salty.[2] Ningbo confectioneries were celebrated all over China during the Qing Dynasty.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beijing 2008 Olympics - Zhejiang Cuisine". People's Daily Online. 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-22. 
  2. ^ a b "Zhejiang Cuisine". China Daily. 2005. Retrieved 2008-09-22. 
  3. ^ Dunlop, Fuchsia (2009-09-26), "Hangzhou’s rich gastronomic history", Financial Times 
  4. ^ "Zhejiang Cuisine and Restaurants". www.ChinaPlanner.com. 2004. Retrieved 2008-09-22. 
  5. ^ Marcus Benjamin, Arthur Elmore Bostwick, Gerald Van Casteel, George Jotham Hagar, ed. (1910). Appleton's new practical cyclopedia: a new work of reference based upon the best authorities, and systematically arranged for use in home and school. Volume 4 of Appleton's New Practical Cyclopedia. NEW YORK: D. Appleton and company,. p. 432. Retrieved 18 July 2011. (Original from the University of Michigan)