Zheng Shiqi

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This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zheng.
Zheng Shiqi
Zhengshiqi.jpg
Zheng Shiqi
Native name 鄭士琦
Born 1873
Dingyuan, Anhui
Died 1935 (age 78–79)
Jinan, Shandong
Allegiance
Rank General
Commands held General
Zheng Shiqi
Traditional Chinese 鄭士琦
Simplified Chinese 郑士琦

Zheng Shiqi (1873, Dingyuan, Anhui, China - 1935, Jinan, Shandong, China), was a Chinese General, military governor of Shandong (1923–25) and Anhui (1925).[1]

He was military Governor of Shandong from 15 Oct 1923 - 24 Apr 1925 and military governor of Anhui from 24 Apr 1925 - 29 Aug 1925.[2] Zheng was an Anfu Club General.

During the Second Zhili–Fengtian War, as the Zhili army marched on Fengtian forces, On September 27, 1924, Zheng cabled Cao Kun, the Chinese president. Beijing sent 250,000 troops with modern weaponry against Zhang Zuolin's forces in Manchuria. Zheng said "Mukden will be captured in a matter of days".[3]

Zheng, who was displeased Fengtian clique leader Zhang Zuolin made Zhang Zongchang commander in Shandong and transferred Zheng to the position of governor of Anhui, declared the province neutral. Fengtian forces were not allowed entry, and the railroad was torn up as part of the resistance plan.[4]

During the Second Zhili–Fengtian War in 1924, as the Fengtian clique General Zhang Zongchang moved down the Tianjin-Pukou railway toward Jiangsu and eventually Shanghai, Zheng Shiqi declared Shandong's neutrality and forced Zhang's forces into retreat to Cangzhou. But when a government with Duan Qirui was installed as head of state of China, at the beginning of December Duan permitted Fengtian forces to occupy Jiangsu while guaranteeing Zheng's position at Shandong. Zheng then permitted Fengtian troops to pass, and on December 10 he abandoned his neutrality, joining the Fengtian forces.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rulers Index Z
  2. ^ China Provinces and Administrative Divisions
  3. ^ Arthur Waldron (2003). From War to Nationalism: China's Turning Point, 1924-1925. Cambridge University Press. p. 162. ISBN 0-521-52332-X. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  4. ^ Arthur Waldron (2003). From War to Nationalism: China's Turning Point, 1924-1925. Cambridge University Press. p. 215. ISBN 0-521-52332-X. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  5. ^ Arthur Waldron (2003). From War to Nationalism: China's Turning Point, 1924-1925. Cambridge University Press. p. 230. ISBN 0-521-52332-X. Retrieved 2010-06-28.