Zikism

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Zikism is the system of political thought attributed to Nnamdi Azikiwe, one of the founding fathers of modern Nigeria and the first democratically elected President of Nigeria. Azikiwe expanded on this philosophy through his published works such as Renascent Africa (1973) and his autobiography My Odyssey.

Overview[edit]

Zikism is characterised by five principles for African liberation:

  • Spiritual balance
To show empathy for other peoples views, and recognize their right to hold such views.
  • Social regeneration
To expel from one's self national, religious, racial, tribal, political-economic, and ethical prejudice.
  • Economic determinism
To realize that being self-sufficient economically is the basis for rescuing the Renascent African.
  • Mental emancipation
To be knowledgeable of African history and accomplishments, and to dismiss any kind of complex exhibited by any race or tribe.
  • Political resurgence
To regain the sovereignty that Africa has lost to colonialists.

Quotes on Zikism[edit]

In the case of the great Zik, it became fashionable among his adherents and supporters to be a Zikist. But interestingly, Zikism was not synonymous with an ethnic ideology nor did it a divisive cause. Instead, Zikism was more an ideology for African reniascence emphasizing the restoration of the dignity of the black man after centuries of colonial imposition and exploitation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Babangida, Ibrahim (2003). "We Must Nurture Politics of Ideas". ThisDay Online. Leaders & Company Limited. Retrieved 2007-07-23.