Zoltan Kuharszky

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Zoltán Kuharszky
Country  Hungary1982–1995
  Switzerland1995–
Born (1959-07-08) July 8, 1959 (age 55)
Budapest, Hungary
Turned pro 1982
Retired 1985 (as a player)
Career record 43–71
Career record 53–65
Coaching career (1995–)
Coaching achievements
Coachee Singles Titles total 1(I)-2(Sz)-3(Hu)
Coachee(s) Doubles Titles total 2(Sz)-2(He)-1(Hu)
Coaching awards and records
Awards

Hungarian Coach of the year 2007[7]

Records

Sony Ericsson WTA Tour most Improved player (2005) (Ivanovic)
WTA Newcomer of the Year (2007) (Szávay)

Zoltán Kuhárszky (born July 8, 1959 in Budapest, Hungary) is a former Hungarian tennis player who became a Swiss citizen in 1995. Kuharszky won 2 doubles titles during his professional career. The right-hander reached his highest singles ATP ranking on July 30, 1984, when he became the number 53 in the world, though he never won a singles title in his career.[8]

Kuharszky participated in one Davis Cup tie for Hungary in 1980, posting a 1-1 record in his singles matches as Hungary lost the tie to Switzerland.

Zoltan Kuharszky is currently coaching Petra Martić (CRO) on the WTA Tour. In the past he also coached Anke Huber (GER), Jennifer Capriati (USA), Ana Ivanovic (SRB), Myriam Casanova (SUI), Ágnes Szávay (HUN), and Polona Hercog (SLO).

Doubles titles (2)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Winner 1. 1982 Buenos Aires, Argentina Clay Austria Hans Kary Spain Ángel Giménez
Spain Manuel Orantes
7–5, 6–2
Runner-up 1. 1983 Madrid, Spain Clay Switzerland Markus Günthardt Switzerland Heinz Günthardt
Czechoslovakia Pavel Složil
3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 2. 1983 Venice, Italy Clay Israel Steve Krulevitz Paraguay Francisco González
Paraguay Víctor Pecci
1–6, 2–6
Runner-up 3. 1983 Kitzbühel, Austria Clay Zimbabwe Colin Dowdeswell Poland Wojtek Fibak
Czechoslovakia Pavel Složil
5–7, 2–6
Winner 2. 1983 Tel Aviv, Israel Hard Zimbabwe Colin Dowdeswell West Germany Peter Elter
Austria Peter Feigl
6–4, 7–5

References[edit]

External links[edit]