Zouch Tate

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Zouch Tate (1606–1650) was an English Member of Parliament.

Life[edit]

He was the son of Sir William Tate and Elizabeth, daughter of Edward la Zouche, 11th Baron Zouche, and nephew of Francis Tate.[1] He matriculated on 26 October 1621 at Trinity College, Oxford, and entered the Middle Temple in 1625.[2]

Tate represented Northampton in the Long Parliament, and swore the Solemn League and Covenant.[2] In November 1644, he was appointed chairman of a committee to investigate Cromwell's accusations against the army, and on 9 December 1644 he moved the Self-denying Ordinance in the House of Commons, proposing that no member of the Lords or Commons should hold any military or naval command.

A speech delivered on 30 July 1645 was printed in Observations on the King and Queen's Cabinet of Letters, 1645.[2] Although not one of those members excluded by Pride's Purge in December 1648, he is not recorded as having sat afterwards. He died in 1650.

References[edit]

  • Concise Dictionary of National Biography (1930)
  • D. Brunton & D. H. Pennington, Members of the Long Parliament (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1954)
  • www.british-civil-wars.co.uk

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hollis, Daniel Webster. "Tate, Zouch". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/26989.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ a b c  "Tate, Francis". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain"Tate, Francis". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.