Zygophyllum fabago

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Zygophyllum fabago
Morsana1.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Zygophyllales
Family: Zygophyllaceae
Genus: Zygophyllum
Species: Z. fabago
Binomial name
Zygophyllum fabago
L.[1]

Zygophyllum fabago is a species of plant known by the common name Syrian bean-caper. It is considered a noxious weed of economic importance in many of the western United States. It is native to Asia and eastern Europe.[1]

Growth[edit]

The Syrian bean-caper grows long, thin stems with few oval-shaped, fleshy, waxy green leaflets each 2 to 3 centimeters in length. The flowers are small, compact bunches of five petals each with prominent stamens. The flowers have a taste and scent similar to caper. It grows in masses of individual plants, forming colonies, especially in dry, gravelly, saline, or disturbed areas where other plant life is rare.

Characteristics[edit]

The plant has invasive potential due to its long taproot which, even if fragmented, can produce a new plant, as well as the hardy wax coating on its leaves that tends to protect it from herbicides.

Chemical constituents[edit]

It contains about 0.002% harmine (entire plant).[2]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]