Garam masala

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A garam masala

Garam masala (Hindi: गरम मसाला, Punjabi: ਗਰਮ ਮਸਾਲਾ, Urdu: گرم مصالحہ‎, Bengali: গরম মসলা garam ("hot") and masala (a mixture of spices)) is a blend of ground spices common in cuisines from the Indian subcontinent.[1] It is used alone or with other seasonings. The word garam refers to "heating the body" in the Ayurvedic sense of the word, as these spices are believed to elevate body temperature in Ayurvedic medicine.

Ingredients[edit]

Typical Ingredients for a garam masala (clockwise from upper left): Black peppercorns, mace, cinnamon, cloves, brown cardamom, nutmeg, and green cardamom. However, others can be used.

The composition of garam masala differs regionally, with many recipes across the Indian subcontinent according to regional and personal taste,[1] and none is considered more authentic than others. The components of the mix are toasted, then ground together.

A typical Indian version of garam masala contains:

Some recipes[2] call for the spices to be blended with herbs, while others call for the spices to be ground with water, vinegar, or other liquids, to make a paste. In some recipes, ingredients including nuts, onions, or garlic may be added. Some recipes also call for small quantities of star anise, asafoetida, chili, stone flower (known as dagadphool), and kababchini (cubeb). The flavours may be carefully blended to achieve a balanced effect, or a single flavour may be emphasized. A masala may be toasted before use to release its flavours and aromas.[1]

There are many sites presented recipes using Garam Masala or showing how to make garam masala.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rama Rau, Santha (June 1969). The Cooking of India (Foods of the World). USA: Time Life Education. ISBN 978-0-8094-0069-0. 
  2. ^ Bhide, Monica Garam Masala: A Taste Worth Acquiring npr.org April 27, 2011


External links[edit]

https://recipeschannel.com/grounded-garam-masala-recipe/