Émile Baraize

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Émile Baraize (28 August 1874 – 15 April 1952, Cairo) was a French Egyptologist.

Life[edit]

In 1912 he succeeded Alessandro Barsanti as director of the director of works within the Egyptian Antiquities Service. Throughout his life, he worked to restore and rebuild several ancient buildings, especially the Great Sphinx of Giza. From 1925 to 1936 he was involved in its restoration, which involved completely clearing away the sand from it, and directed excavations around it and inside it, in search of the rooms which many 19th century Egyptologists believed lay within it. These excavations were hurried and had to be carried out with minimal equipment, but they did partially succeed in their objectives, for Baraize discovered a tunnel starting at the rump,[1] which he explored before the entry was condemned. He ended up filling the massive fissure separating the rump from the rest of the body with cement, blocking the interior passage within and effectively preventing exploration of the upper rump tunnel and connecting passage that is believed to lead down to a burial chamber.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hawass, Zahi (February 10, 1997). "Pyramids: Responses to Your Questions". Nova Online. Retrieved 30 June 2010. 
  2. ^ Temple, Robert (2009). "The Sphinx Mystery: The Forgotten Origins of the Sanctuary of Anubis". Inner Traditions.