Øvrebø

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Øvrebø
Village
View of the village church
View of the village church
Øvrebø is located in Vest-Agder
Øvrebø
Øvrebø
Øvrebø is located in Norway
Øvrebø
Øvrebø
Location of the village
Coordinates: 58°17′29″N 07°46′42″E / 58.29139°N 7.77833°E / 58.29139; 7.77833Coordinates: 58°17′29″N 07°46′42″E / 58.29139°N 7.77833°E / 58.29139; 7.77833
Country Norway
Region Southern Norway
County Vest-Agder
District Kristiansand
Municipality Vennesla
Elevation[1] 225 m (738 ft)
Time zone CET (UTC+01:00)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+02:00)
Post Code 4715 Øvrebø

Øvrebø is a rural district and village in Vennesla municipality in Vest-Agder county, Norway. The village is located about 25 km (16 mi) north-northwest of the city of Kristiansand. The village of Skarpengland lies about 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) east of Øvrebø.

The district of Øvrebø covers the central part of Vennesla municipality. Historically, the district of Øvrebø was a separate municipality known as Øvrebø which existed from 1838 until 1865, and then again from 1896 until 1964.[2] In Skarpengland, there is a bank, a post office, several stores, a motor repair shop, and a school. Øvrebø is known for the "Øvrebø ski", found at Mushom and considered for many years to be Norway's oldest preserved ski. It can be seen in the Holmenkollen Ski Museum in Oslo.

Name[edit]

The village is named after the old Øvrebø farm (Old Norse: Øfribœr), since the first Øvrebø Church was built there. The first part of the name means "upper" and second part of the name is identical with the word bœr which means "farm" and it is cognate with the Dutch language word "boer" which means "farmer". The name therefore means "the upper farm".[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Øvrebø, Vennesla (Vest-Agder)". yr.no. Retrieved 2017-01-16. 
  2. ^ Store norske leksikon. "Øvrebø – tidligere kommune" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2017-01-16. 
  3. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1912). Norske gaardnavne: Lister og Mandals amt (in Norwegian) (9 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 36. 

External links[edit]