Ōnishiki Daigorō

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ōnishiki Daigorō
大錦 大五郎
Ōnishiki Daigorō.jpg
Personal information
Born Kichisaburo Yamada
1883
Aichi, Japan
Died May 18, 1943(1943-05-18) (aged 60)
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Weight 112 kg (247 lb)
Career
Stable Asahiyama
Record 162-50-74
14draws-10holds
(Makuuchi in Osaka)
Debut November 1898
Highest rank Yokozuna (April 1918)
Retired January 1922
Championships 6 (Osaka Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Ōnishiki Daigorō (大錦 大五郎, 1883 – May 18, 1943) was a sumo wrestler. He was the sport's 28th yokozuna.

Career[edit]

Ōnishiki was born in Ama District, Aichi Prefecture, Japan, in what is now Yatomi City. There are several conflicting sources as to his birth date.

He started sumo in Kyoto in 1898, later moving to Osaka. He entered the top makuuchi division in February 1906. He was promoted to ōzeki in June 1910. In April 1918 he became the 28th yokozuna (the third in Osaka sumo). The reason for his promotion to yokozuna was cited as being because of his great dignity.[1] He fought in eight tournaments as yokozuna, retiring after the January 1922 basho.

After retirement he ran a tea house in Osaka.

Some of his memorabilia is on display in a museum in Yatomi City.

Osaka sumo top division record[edit]

  • Osaka sumo existed independently for many years before merging with Tokyo sumo in 1926. 1-2 tournaments were held yearly, though the actual time they were held was often erratic.
Ōnishiki Daigorō[2]
First Second
1906 East Maegashira #8
5–2–1
1d 1h

 
East Maegashira #5
4–1–5
 
1907 West Maegashira #1
5–2–1
2h

 
West Komusubi
6–3–1
 
1908 West Sekiwake
6–3–1
 
West Sekiwake
8–1–1
 
1909 West Sekiwake
5–3–2
 
West Sekiwake
7–1–2
 
1910 West Sekiwake
3–2–3
1d 1h

 
West Ōzeki
5–3–1
1d

 
1911 West Ōzeki
2–3–4
1d

 
West Ōzeki
8–1–1
Unofficial

 
1912 West Ōzeki
7–1–1
1d

 
Not held
1913 West Ōzeki
7–2–1
 
West Ōzeki
7–2–1
Unofficial

 
1914 West Ōzeki
6–1–3
 
West Ōzeki
8–0–1
1d
Unofficial

 
1915 East Ōzeki
6–2–2
 
East Ōzeki
8–0–2
Unofficial

 
1916 East Ōzeki
5–2–2
1h

 
Not held
1917 East Ōzeki
8–0
2h
Unofficial

 
East Ōzeki
7–1
1d 1h

 
1918 West Ōzeki
8–1
1h
Unofficial

 
East Yokozuna
2–4–3
1d

 
1919 West Yokozuna
1–1–8
 
West Yokozuna
6–2
2d

 
1920 West Yokozuna
1–1–8
 
East Yokozuna
4–3
2d 1h

 
1921 Sat out East Yokozuna
4–0–5
1d

 
1922 West Yokozuna
3–2–4
1d

 

Retired
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded in Osaka sumo before its merger with Tokyo sumo, and the unofficial championships above are historically conferred. For more information, see yūshō.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Atsuo Tsubota. 横綱伝 26代~31代 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2008-05-26. 
  2. ^ 横綱力士幕内星取表 (in Japanese). 

See also[edit]

Previous:
Tochigiyama Moriya
28th Yokozuna
1918 - 1922
Next:
Miyagiyama Fukumatsu
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title