Ōnomatsu Midorinosuke

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
阿武松 緑之助
Ōnomatsu Midorinosuke
Ohnomatsu Midorinosuke.jpg
Personal information
Born Sasaki Jokichi
1794
Ishikawa, Japan
Died January 20, 1852(1852-01-20)
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Weight 135 kg (298 lb)
Career
Stable Takekuma
Record 142-31-37
24draws-8holds-1no result
(Makuuchi)
Debut March, 1815
Highest rank Yokozuna (February, 1828)
Retired November, 1835
Championships 5 (Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of October 2007.

Ōnomatsu Midorinosuke (阿武松 緑之助, 1794 – January 20, 1852) was a sumo wrestler from Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. He was the sport's 6th yokozuna. He trained ōzeki Tsurugizan Taniemon.

Early career[edit]

He was born in Shitsumi, Noto and went to Edo in 1815. His birth name remains ambiguous, but was claimed to be Sasaki Jokichi. He made his debut under the ring name Koyanagi in March 1815. He reached the top makuuchi division in October 1822. In January 1824, he was defeated by Inazuma, but defeated others at the maegashira #2 rank and was promoted to komusubi.

In the summer of 1825, he defeated Inazuma at the Hirakawa Tenjin Shrine.[1] He was promoted to ōzeki in October 1826. He changed his ring name to Ōnomatsu in March 1827.

Yokozuna[edit]

Ōnomatsu was awarded a yokozuna license in February 1828. On March 25, 1829, Ienari Tokugawa saw that Ōnomatsu defeated Inazuma.[1]

Because he grew up in a poor family, he attempted to win bouts by fair means or foul.[2] To shake competitors' confidence, he would often do matta, or waiting, at the initial charge, or tachi-ai of his sumo bouts. He was often criticized for his fighting style. Even so, he was popular in Edo.

He retired in November 1835. In the top makuuchi division, he won 142 bouts and lost 31 bouts, recording a winning percentage of 82.1. The 7th yokozuna Inazuma was his rival. His overall career record was quite far behind Inazuma, but his record over Inazuma was five wins (including two other than honbasho), four losses, five draws and one hold.

Top division record[edit]

  • The actual time the tournaments were held during the year in this period often varied.
Ōnomatsu Midorinosuke[3]
- Spring Winter
1822 x East Maegashira #7
6–3–1
1d

 
1823 East Maegashira #5
4–2
1nr

 
East Maegashira #2
7–2
1d

 
1824 East Maegashira #2
8–1–1
Unofficial

 
East Komusubi
6–2–2
 
1825 East Komusubi
8–2
Unofficial

 
East Sekiwake
6–2–2
 
1826 East Sekiwake
5–1–3
1h

 
East Ōzeki
8–0–1
1d
Unofficial

 
1827 East Ōzeki
4–1–1
1h

 
East Ōzeki
6–0
Unofficial

 
1828 East Ōzeki
3–3–2
1d 1h

 
East Ōzeki
7–1–2
 
1829 East Ōzeki
5–0–1
1d

 
East Ōzeki
6–0–1
2d 1h

 
1830 East Ōzeki
7–1–1
1h

 
East Ōzeki
3–1–4
2h

 
1831 East Ōzeki
4–0–4
2d

 
East Ōzeki
3–0–5
 
1832 Not held East Ōzeki
7–1–1
1d

 
1833 East Ōzeki
5–0–1
4d

 
East Ōzeki
2–2
3d 1h

 
1834 East Ōzeki
6–1–1
2d

 
East Ōzeki
5–3–1
1d

 
1835 East Ōzeki
7–0–1
2d
Unofficial

 
East Ōzeki
Retired
4–2–2
2d
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り);   nr=no result recorded
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: 
Yokozuna (not ranked as such on banzuke until 1890)
ŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded before the 1909 summer tournament, and the unofficial championships above are historically conferred. For more information, see yūshō.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 阿武松緑之助 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2008-07-15. 
  2. ^ 稲妻雷五郎の像 (in Japanese). Joyo Living. 2007-08-17. Retrieved 2008-07-04. 
  3. ^ "Onomatsu Midorinosuke Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Onogawa Kisaburō
6th Yokozuna
1828 - 1835
Next:
Inazuma Raigorō
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title