Ōtaki (New Zealand electorate)

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Ōtaki electorate boundaries used since the 2014 election

Ōtaki (previously Otaki) is a New Zealand Parliamentary electorate, spanning part of the coast of the lower North Island. The bulk of its population comes from the Horowhenua District, but it also takes in part of the northern Kapiti Coast, including the towns of Otaki and Waikanae, and part of Paraparaumu. The current MP for Ōtaki is Nathan Guy of the National Party. He has held this position since 2008 election.

Population centres[edit]

In the 1892 electoral redistribution, population shift to the North Island required the transfer of one seat from the South Island to the north. The resulting ripple effect saw every electorate established in 1890 have its boundaries altered, and eight electorates were established for the first time, including Otaki.[1]

History[edit]

Otaki was created for the 1893 election, and the first member for Otaki was James Wilson, who held the seat until 1896. For most of the early 1900s the seat was won by William Hughes Field, a Liberal-turn-independent-turn-Reform. He lost it to John Robertson of the Social Democratic Party (who had been nominated by the flax-workers union) in 1911, but won it back in 1914.

The seat was abolished in 1972, and Allan McCready transferred to the Manawatu electorate.

Otaki was recreated ahead of the change to Mixed Member Proportional voting in 1996, by combining two bellwether seats: the northern half of Kapiti with the entire Horowhenua seat. Since its inception the boundaries have been left largely unaltered, though after the 2007 boundary review a macron was added to the name, and it is now spelt Ōtaki. The first MP for Otaki was Judy Keall, who won by less than a thousand votes in 1996 before a more decisive victory in 1999.[2] In 2002, her former electorate assistant Darren Hughes won the seat, becoming the youngest member of the House of Representatives. His 2002 majority was slashed to just 382 at the 2005 election by former Horowhenua District councillor Nathan Guy. In a 2008 rematch, Guy tipped out Hughes by 1,354 votes; Hughes returned to Parliament off the Labour Party list.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Unless otherwise stated, all MPs' terms began and ended at general elections.

Key

 Independent    Liberal    Reform    Labour    Labour    National  

Election Winner
1893 election James Wilson
1896 election 1899 election Henry Augustus Field
1900 by-election 1902 election 1905 election William Field
1908 election
1911 election John Robertson
1914 election 1919 election 1922 election 1925 election 1928 election 1931 election William Field
1935 election 1938 election 1943 election Leonard Lowry
1946 election 1949 election 1951 election 1954 election 1957 election James Joseph Maher
1960 election 1963 election 1966 election 1969 election Allan McCready
(electorate abolished 1972–1996, see Kapiti and Manawatu)
1996 election 1999 election Judy Keall
2002 election 2005 election Darren Hughes
2008 election 2011 election 2014 election Nathan Guy

List MPs[edit]

Members of Parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs' terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
1996 election Roger Sowry
1999 election
2002 election
2005 election Nathan Guy
2008 election Darren Hughes

Election results[edit]

2014 election[edit]

General election, 2014: Ōtaki[3]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
National Green tickY Nathan Guy 20,980 54.80 +3.23 18,854 48.71 +1.92
Labour Rob McCann 13,198 34.47 −3.01 9,543 24.65 −4.94
Green Maddy Drew 2,462 6.43 +1.72 3,635 9.39 +0.21
Conservative Anne Lovelock 913 2.38 +0.65 1,695 4.38 +1.19
Independent Amanda Vickers 203 0.53 +0.53
Independent Frederick Macdonald 118 0.31 +0.31
NZ First   3,827 9.89 +1.77
Internet Mana   249 0.64 +0.43[a]
Māori   169 0.44 −0.12
Legalise Cannabis   138 0.36 −0.07
ACT   111 0.29 −0.38
United Future   74 0.19 −0.52
Ban 1080   61 0.16 +0.16
Democrats   19 0.05 +0.01
Independent Coalition   19 0.05 +0.05
Civilian   12 0.03 +0.03
Focus   6 0.02 +0.02
Informal votes 412 298
Total Valid votes 38,286 38,710
Turnout 38,710 82.49 +3.23
National hold Majority 7,782 20.33 +6.24

2011 election[edit]

General election, 2011: Ōtaki[4]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
National Green tickY Nathan Guy 19,151 51.57 +2.90 17,609 46.79 +2.02
Labour Peter Foster 13,920 37.48 -7.70 11,137 29.59 -7.36
Green Michael Gilchrist 1,750 4.71 +2.06 3,612 9.60 +3.96
NZ First David Scott 1,122 3.02 +1.02 3,057 8.12 +2.63
Conservative John Stephen Ryersson 644 1.73 +1.73 1,202 3.19 +3.19
Legalise Cannabis Fred MacDonald 253 0.68 +0.68 162 0.43 +0.14
ACT Peter McCaffrey 115 0.31 -0.23 253 0.67 -1.92
United Future Diane Brown 110 0.30 -0.09 266 0.71 -0.31
Independent Philip Dean Taueki 73 0.20 +0.20
Māori   210 0.56 -0.26
Mana   80 0.21 +0.21
Libertarianz   19 0.05 +0.02
Democrats   15 0.04 +0.01
Alliance   11 0.03 -0.04
Informal votes 573 292
Total Valid votes 37,138 37,633
National hold Majority 5,231 14.09 +10.60

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 47,483[5]

2008 election[edit]

General election, 2008: Ōtaki[6]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
National Nathan Guy 18,885 48.67 +3.91 17,534 44.77 +3.10
Labour Red XN Darren Hughes 17,531 45.18 -0.58 14,472 36.95 +4.72
Green Jim Kebbell 1,029 2.65 2,207 5.64 1.09
NZ First David John Scott 778 2.01 2,153 5.50 -1.29
Progressive Josie Pagani 221 0.57 453 1.16 -0.43
ACT Peter McCaffrey 210 0.54 1,014 2.59 +1.60
United Future Diane Brown 148 0.38 -1.25 397 1.01 -2.34
Māori   321 0.82 +0.08
Bill and Ben   177 0.45
Kiwi   165 0.42
Legalise Cannabis   115 0.29 +0.06
Family Party   84 0.21
Alliance   28 0.07 -0.13
Libertarianz   12 0.03 +0.01
Democrats   10 0.03 -0.02
Pacific   9 0.02
Workers Party   6 0.02
RONZ   5 0.01 ±0.00
RAM   0 0.00
Informal votes 186 111
Total Valid votes 38,802 39,162
National gain from Labour Majority 1,354 3.49

2005 election[edit]

General election, 2005: Otaki[7]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Darren Hughes 17,556 45.76 -7.27 16,131 41.67
National Nathan Guy 17,174 44.76 +13.79 15,174 39.20
NZ First Chris Perry 1,043 2.72 2,630 6.79
Green Nick Fisher 1,022 2.66 1,761 4.55
United Future Diane Brown 611 1.59 1,297 3.35
Māori Richard Orzecki 353 0.92 286 0.74
Progressive Russell Franklin 303 0.79 614 1.59
ACT Simon Ewing-Jarvie 163 0.42 383 0.99
Alliance Margaret Jeune 97 0.25 78 0.20
Direct Democracy Robert Atack 47 0.12 7 0.02
Destiny   154 0.40
Legalise Cannabis   88 0.23
Family Rights   54 0.14
Christian Heritage   37 0.10
Democrats   21 0.05
99 MP   14 0.04
One NZ   14 0.04
Libertarianz   9 0.02
RONZ   5 0.01
Informal votes 242 134
Total Valid votes 38,369 38,707
Labour hold Majority 382 1.00 -21.07

1999 election[edit]

Refer to Candidates in the New Zealand general election 1999 by electorate#Otaki for a list of candidates.

1935 election[edit]

General election, 1935: Otaki[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Leonard Lowry 4,511 49.97
United/Reform G. A. Monk[9] 2,791 30.92
Independent Will Appleton[10] 975 10.80
Democrat Robert Westley Bothamley[11] 750 8.31
Majority 1,720 19.05 +3.28
Turnout 9,027 83.26 -0.73
Registered electors 10,842

1931 election[edit]

General election, 1931: Otaki[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Reform William Hughes Field 4,848 57.89
Labour Jim Thorn 3,527 42.11
Majority 1,321 15.77
Informal votes 92 1.09
Turnout 8,467 83.99
Registered electors 10,081

1900 by-election[edit]

Otaki by-election, 1900[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Hughes Field 1,755 52.44
Conservative Charles Morison 1,592 47.56 +2.09
Majority 163 4.87 -4.18
Turnout 3,347 62.35 -0.45
Registered electors 5,368

Table footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ 2014 Internet Mana swing is relative to the votes for Mana in 2011; it shared a party list with Internet in the 2014 election.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 59f.
  2. ^ Counsell, Gerard (31 October 2008). "Swing seats: All eyes on Otaki". One News. Retrieved 8 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "Official Count Results -- Ōtaki (2014)". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 14 April 2016. 
  4. ^ 2011 election results
  5. ^ "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2011. 
  6. ^ 2008 Official Count Results – Ōtaki
  7. ^ 2005 Official Count Results – Otaki
  8. ^ "How the votes were cast". The Evening Post. CXX (130). 28 November 1935. p. 8. Retrieved 16 November 2013. 
  9. ^ "Otaki Seat". The Evening Post. CXX (55). 2 September 1935. p. 10. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  10. ^ "Mr. Appleton's Candidature". The Evening Post. CXX (97). 21 October 1935. p. 11. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  11. ^ "Election Notices". The Evening Post. CXIX (99). 29 April 1935. p. 2. Retrieved 28 March 2014. 
  12. ^ The General Election, 1931. Government Printer. 1932. p. 4. Retrieved 2 November 2014. 
  13. ^ "The Otaki Seat". The New Zealand Herald. XXXVII (11265). 8 January 1900. p. 5. Retrieved 5 February 2015. 

References[edit]

  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 

External links[edit]