Şırnak Province

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Şırnak Province
Şırnak ili
Cizre
Cizre
Location of Şırnak Province in Turkey
Location of Şırnak Province in Turkey
CountryTurkey
RegionSoutheast Anatolia
SubregionMardin
Government
 • Electoral districtŞırnak
 • GovernorAli Hamza Pehlivan
Area
 • Total7,172 km2 (2,769 sq mi)
Population
 (2018)[1]
 • Total524,190
 • Density73/km2 (190/sq mi)
Area code(s)0486[2]
Vehicle registration73

Şırnak Province (Turkish: Şırnak ili, Kurdish: Parêzgeha Şirnexê[3]) is a province of Turkey in the Southeastern Anatolia Region. Şırnak Province was created in 1990, with areas that were formerly part of the Siirt and Mardin Provinces. It borders both Kurdistan Region of Iraq and Syria. The current Governor of the province is Ali Hamza Pehlivan.[4] As of 2013, the province had an estimated population of 475,255 people.[5]

Considered part of Turkish Kurdistan,[6] the province has a Kurdish majority.[7]

Geography[edit]

Midin (village), Tur Abdin

Şırnak Province has some mountainous regions in the west and the south, but the majority of the province consists of plateaus, resulting from the many rivers that cross it. These include the Tigris (and its tributaries Hezil and Kızılsu) and Çağlayan. The most important mountains are Mount Cudi (2089 m),[8] Mount Gabar, Mount Namaz and Mount Altın.

Districts[edit]

Şırnak province is divided into seven districts (capital district in bold):[5]

History[edit]

Inspectorate-General[edit]

In order to Turkify the local population,[9] in June 1927, Law 1164 was passed,[10] which allowed the creation of Inspectorates-General (Umumi Müffetişlik, UM).[11] The province was included in the First Inspectorate General (Turkish: Birinci Umumi Müfettişlik), which covered the provinces of Hakkâri, Siirt, Van, Mardin, Şırnak Bitlis, Sanlıurfa, Elaziğ, and Diyarbakır.[12] The First Inspectorate General was established in January 1928 and had its headquarters in Diyarbakır.[13] The UM was governed by an Inspector General, who governed with a wide-ranging authority over civilian, juridical and military matters.[11] In 1948 the policy of governing the province within the Inspectorate General was abandoned and the administration was not re-employed again,[11] but the office of the Inspector General was only dissolved in 1952 during the government of the Democrat Party.[14]

Kurdish-Turkish conflict[edit]

Şırnak has been a focal point in the ongoing Kurdish-Turkish conflict, which began in 1984.[15] From its creation in 1990 to 2002, Şırnak Province was part of the OHAL (state of emergency) region which was declared to counter the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) and governed by a supergovernor, who was given additional powers than a normal Turkish provincial governor, including the power to relocate and resettle whole settlements.[16] In December 1990, the supergovernor and the provincial governors in the OHAL region received absolute immunity from prosecution in connection with decisions they made under Decree No. 430.[17]

Turkish Forces' operation, 1992[edit]

On 18 August 1992 Turkish forces attacked the city, killing 54 people, mostly children and women. For three days homes were burned, livestock were killed, and people were killed. 20,000 out of 25,000 residents fled the city, Amnesty International reported.[18][19]

During the operation, a curfew was imposed in the town and when it finally ended, the whole city was in ruins.

While the town was under bombardment, there was no way to get an account of what was happening in the region as journalists were prevented from entering the city centre which was completely burned down by the security forces. Şırnak was under fire for three days and tanks and cannons were used to hit buildings occupied by civilians.[20]

On 26 August 1992, Amnesty International sent requests to then Prime Minister, Süleyman Demirel, Interior Minister İsmet Sezgin, Emergency Legislation Governor Ünal Erkan and Şırnak province governor Mustafa Mala, to immediately initiate an independent and impartial inquiry into the events, to ensure no-one was mistreated in police custody and to make their results public.[21]

2015-2016 Clashes[edit]

The 2015–16 Şırnak clashes took place in Şırnak City, Cizre, Idil and Silopi. On 14 March 2016 a curfew was declared in Şırnak province. This marked the start of an 80 day long operation against Kurdish militant in the province. The curfew remained in place for 9 months.[22] 2,044 buildings were destroyed during the military operation.[23]

Ethnic composition of settlements[edit]

Extended content
District Settlement[24] Ethnicity (tribe)
Şırnak Şırnak (Şirnex) Kurdish (Şirnexî)[25]
Şırnak Akçay (Dêra) Kurdish (Dêrşewî)[26]
Şırnak Araköy (Kirun) Kurdish (Berwarî)[27]
Şırnak Atbaşı (Fêrisan) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Bağpınar (Çînete) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Balveren (Melê) Kurdish (Berwarî)[27]
Şırnak Başağaç (Medikeyan) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Dağkonak (Nerex) Kurdish (Berwarî)[27]
Şırnak Geçitboyu (Bîryan) Kurdish (Berwarî)[27]
Şırnak Güneyce (Banê) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Güneyçam (Navyan) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Ikizce (Milga Şantiyê)
Şırnak Kasrik Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Kavuncu (Nanîp) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Kayaboyun (Şerefî) Kurdish (Dêrşewî)[26]
Şırnak Kırkkuyu (Deştalela) Kurdish (Dêrşewî)[26]
Şırnak Kızılsu (Zûrîn) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Koçbeyi (Banê Mihinda) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Körüklükaya (Nehke)
Şırnak Kumçatı (Dergul) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Toptepe (Avka meziyan) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Yeniaslanbaşar (Mila Kere) Kurdish (Botikan)[28]
Şırnak Yoğurtçular (Heştan) Kurdish (Şirnexî)[25]
Beytüşşebap Beytüşşebap (Elkî) Kurdish (Ertoşi, Geravî, Jirkî, Mamxuran and Pinyanîş)[29]
Beytüşşebap Akarsu (Tanga Xana) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Akçayol (Tonk, Şekalwa) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Aşağıdere (Kelê Jêrê) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Ayvalık (Balekî) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Başaran (Ceman) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Beşağaç (Hemka) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Boğazören (Kitêr) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]

Assyrian (in Kovankaya (Meer) hamlet)[32]

Beytüşşebap Bolağaç (Bîşî) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Bölücek (Pîrosa) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Cevizağacı (Geznex) Kurdish (Jirkî)[29]
Beytüşşebap Çığlıca (Karçana) Kurdish (Mamxuran)[33]
Beytüşşebap Dağaltı (Tivor) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Doğanyol (Pîrdoda) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Gökçe (Ewrek) Kurdish (Mamxuran)[33]
Beytüşşebap Güneyyaka (Batê) Kurdish (Jirkî)[29]
Beytüşşebap Günyüzü (Mesele) Kurdish (Qeşûran)[34]
Beytüşşebap Ilıcak (Gundê Germav) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Koyunoba (Zerbêl) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Mezra Kurdish (Mamxuran)[33]
Beytüşşebap Mutluca (Kespiyanîş) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Ortalı (Bêzal) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Oymakkaya (Dûhlê) Kurdish (Qeşûran)[34]
Beytüşşebap Pirinçli (Cemê Heskî) Kurdish (Jirkî)[31]
Beytüşşebap Söğütce (Govik) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Toptepe (Kaçet) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Beytüşşebap Yeşilöz (Feraşina Jorê) Kurdish (Gewdan)[30]
Cizre Cizre (Cizîre) Kurdish (Aluwa, Amara, Elikî, Kiçan and Meman)[35]
Cizre Aşağıçeşme (Bîr Yakup) Kurdish (Meman)[36]
Cizre Aşağıkonak (Eywan, Xolana Jêrî) Kurdish (Tayan)[37]
Cizre Bağlarbaşı (Serdehil) Kurdish (Meman)[38]
Cizre Bozalan (Behmor) Kurdish (Tayan)[37]
Cizre Çağıl (Sirsirk) Kurdish (Meman)[36]
Cizre Çatal (Sitevrik) Kurdish (Kiçan and Meman)[39]
Cizre Çavuş (Ernebat) Kurdish (Amara and Meman)[40]
Cizre Dirsekli (Gemdawû) Kurdish (Botikan)[41]
Cizre Düzova (Hoser) Kurdish (Meman)[38]
Cizre Erdem (Dimbilîya) Kurdish (Meman)[38]
Cizre Güçlü (Cibrî) Kurdish (Amara and Meman)[40]
Cizre Gürsü (Gozik) Kurdish (Amara and Meman)[40]
Cizre Havuzlu (Birkê) Kurdish (Tayan)[37]
Cizre Katran (Bazift) Kurdish (Kiçan, Meman and Xêrikan)[42]
Cizre Kaya (Pêlisî) Kurdish (Elikî)[43]
Cizre Kebeli (Babil) Kurdish (Omerkan)[44]
Cizre Keruh (Karox) Kurdish (Zêvkî)[45]
Cizre Kocapınar (Emerin) Kurdish (Amara and Meman)[40]
Cizre Koçtepe (Tirehfêrik) Kurdish (Omerkan)[44]
Cizre Korucu (Derbacîya) Kurdish (Elikî and Meman)[46]
Cizre Kuştepe (Basisk) Kurdish (Meman)[38]
Cizre Kurtuluş (Mûsîrê) Kurdish (Botikan)[47]
Cizre Sulak (Nêrhib) Kurdish (Amara)[48]
Cizre Taşhöyük (Girgevir) Kurdish (Amara, Meman and Omerkan)[49]
Cizre Tepeönü (Batil) Kurdish (Meman)[38]
Cizre Uğur (Tilebêr) Kurdish (Aluwa)[50]
Cizre Ulaş (Zêvîk) Kurdish (Kiçan and Meman)[39]
Cizre Varlık (Gijal) Kurdish (Elikî)[43]
Cizre Yakacık (Fêrîsî) Kurdish (Tayan)[37]
Cizre Yalıntepe (Bêdar) Kurdish (Amara and Meman)[40]
Cizre Yeşilyurt (Cinibrî) Kurdish (Meman)[38]
Güçlükonak Güçlükonak (Basan) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
Güçlükonak Ağaçyurdu (Zivinga Şikakan) Kurdish (Jilyan)[52]
Güçlükonak Akçakuşak (Şikefta Spî) Kurdish (Harunan and Şîkakî)[51][53]
Güçlükonak Akdizgin (Zêvê) Kurdish (Welatî)[52]
Güçlükonak Boyuncuk (Hetma) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
Güçlükonak Çevrimli (Gêrê) Kurdish (Şîkakî)[53]
Güçlükonak Çobankazanı (Şehka) Kurdish (Harunan)[54]
Güçlükonak Damlabaşı (Dilok) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
Güçlükonak Damlarca (Keraşa) Kurdish (Welatî)[52]
Güçlükonak Dağyeli (Nevyan) Kurdish (Jilyan)[52]
Güçlükonak Demirboğaz (Gerger) Kurdish (Jilyan)[52]
Güçlükonak Düğünyurdu (Tarunî) Kurdish (Şîkakî)[53]
Güçlükonak Fındık (Findikê) Kurdish (Jilyan)[55]

Kurdish (Welatî) in Kırkağaç (Avên, Bênat) hamlet[55]

Güçlükonak Koçtepe (Hista/Xestê) Kurdish (Şîkakî)[56]
Güçlükonak Ormaniçi (Bana) Kurdish (Welatî)[52]
Güçlükonak Sağkol (Hejîr) Kurdish (Harunan)[57]
Güçlükonak Taşkonak (Şikeftiyan) Kurdish (Jilyan)[52]
Güçlükonak Yağızoymak (Zivinge) Kurdish (Hecî Elya)[55]
Güçlükonak Yağmurkuyusu (Cêleka) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
Güçlükonak Yatağankaya (Xoran) Kurdish (Şîkakî)[56]
İdil İdil Kurdish (Domanan, Dorîkan, Harunan, Meman and Omerkan)[58][59]
İdil Açma (Xirabê Sosîna) Kurdish (Hemikan)[60]
İdil Akdağ (Zengilok) Kurdish (Alikan)[43]
İdil Akkoyunlu (Bezîkir) Kurdish (Domanan)[60]
İdil Aksoy (Memolan) Kurdish (Botikan and Seyit)[60]
İdil Alakamış (Eleqamiş) Kurdish (Hemikan)[61]
İdil Başakköy (Basaqê) Kurdish (Domanan)[60]
İdil Bereketli (Fîl) Kurdish (Omerkan)[61]
İdil Bozburun (Zinarex) Kurdish (Dera and Seyit)[60]
İdil Bozkır (Daskan) Kurdish (Salihan)[60]
İdil Çığır (Serkanî) Kurdish (Botikan)[62]
İdil Çınarlı (Kakvan) Kurdish (Salihan)[60]
İdil Çukurlu (Xenduk) Kurdish (Omerkan)[63]
İdil Dirsekli (Xirabê Şeref) Kurdish (Meman)[51]
İdil Dumanlı (Kefsur) Kurdish (Domanan)[60]
İdil Duruköy (Danêrê) Kurdish (Hesinan)[51]
İdil Gedik (Dîpik) Kurdish (Hesinan)[64]
İdil Güzelova (Hanabaso) Kurdish (Dorîkan)[60]
İdil Haberli (Basîbrîn) Assyrian and Kurdish (Salihan)[60]
İdil Hendekköy (Xendek) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
İdil Işık (Xaltan) Kurdish (Dorîkan)[60]
İdil Karalar (Araban) Kurdish (Domanan)[60]
İdil Kaşıkçı (Heskal) Kurdish (Dermemîkan and Salihan)[60]
İdil Kayalı (Kefşîn) Kurdish (Dorîkan)[61]
İdil Kayı (Hedîl) Kurdish (Omerkan)[61]
İdil Kentli (Bazgur) Kurdish (Dorîkan)[60]
İdil Kırca (Avdika) Kurdish (Botikan)[60]
İdil Kozluca (Xanikê) Kurdish (Dasikan)[65]
İdil Köyceğiz (Tupîçe) Kurdish (Hesinan)[66]
İdil Kurtuluş (Batil) Kurdish (Botikan and Salihan)[60]
İdil Kuyulu (Selekûn) Kurdish (Hesinan)[66]
İdil Mağaraköy (Kiweh) Kurdish (Hevirkan and Salihan)[60][67]
İdil Ocaklı (Banih) Kurdish (Hesinan)[61]
İdil Okçu (Sivik) Kurdish (Alikan)[43]
İdil Ortaca (Xirabê Derîka) Kurdish (Hemikan)[60]
İdil Ortaköy (Şehesan) Kurdish (Hesinan and Seyit)[68]
İdil Oyalı (Delavekasre) Kurdish (Hemikan)[60]
İdil Oymak (Rîzok) Kurdish (Hesinan)[66]
İdil Öğündük (Midih) Assyrian and Kurdish (Domanan)[60]
İdil Özbek (Tilsexan) Kurdish (Dera and Salihan)[60]
İdil Özen (Harabetuva) Kurdish (Alikan and Meman)[69]
İdil Peçenek (Mirik) Kurdish (Dorikan)[61]
İdil Pınarbaşı (Aynserê) Kurdish (Hesinan)[66]
İdil Sarıköy (Sare) Assyrian and Kurdish (Salihan)[60]
İdil Sırtköy (Tilêla) Kurdish (Kiçan and Meman)[70][59]
İdil Sulak (Bafê) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
İdil Tekkeköy (Harabeneriya) Kurdish (Alikan and Omerkan)[71]
İdil Tepecik (Seregir) Kurdish (Hesinan)[60]
İdil Tepeköy (Xirabê Reppin) Kurdish (Aluwa and Hesinan)[43][66]
İdil Toklu (Axrît) Kurdish (Dera)[60]
İdil Topraklı (Hvark) Kurdish (Domanan and Dorikan)[60]
İdil Uçarlı (Temerz) Kurdish (Domanan)[60]
İdil Uğrak (Xirabê Mişa) Kurdish (Hemikan and Hesinan)[61]
İdil Ulak (Fîlfel) Kurdish (Salihan)[60]
İdil Üçok (Babek) Kurdish (Hesinan)[60]
İdil Varımli (Kara Xirab) Kurdish (Dera and Hemikan)[60]
İdil Yağmurca (Heylanî) Kurdish (Alikan and Omerkan)[71]
İdil Yalaz (Arzanex) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
İdil Yarbaşı (Hespîst) Kurdish (Omerkan)[61]
İdil Yavşan (Zergos) Kurdish (Alikan)[43]
İdil Yazman (Hacî Kasan) Kurdish (Hemikan)[60]
İdil Yayalar (Soran) Kurdish (Salihan)[60]
İdil Yolaçan (Narîncî) Kurdish (Hesinan)[60]
İdil Yörük (Dikê) Kurdish (Alikan)[43]
İdil Yuvalı (Xandex) Kurdish (Harunan)[51]
İdil Yüksekköy (Barim) Kurdish (Aluwa)[61]
Silopi Silopi (Silopî) Kurdish (Sipêrtî and Zevkî)[45][72]
Silopi Aksu (Herbûl) Assyrian[73]
Silopi Aktepe (Girê Gewir) Kurdish (Zevkî)[45]
Silopi Akyıldız (Babindak) Kurdish (Tayan)[74]
Silopi Başak (Zêdga) Kurdish (Girkê Emo)[75]
Silopi Başverimli Kurdish (Bersuva)[76]
Silopi Birlikköy (Cimayî) Kurdish (Hecî Beyram)[77]
Silopi Bostancı (Rihanî) Kurdish (Sipêrtî and Tayan)[72][78]
Silopi Buğdaylı (Taqyan) Kurdish (Tayan)[78]
Silopi Çalışkan (Gitê) Kurdish (Bersuva)[76]
Silopi Çardaklı (Kolyan) Kurdish (Sipêrtî)[72]
Silopi Çiftlikköy (Bedrû) Kurdish (Tayan)[78]
Silopi Damlaca (Silib)
Silopi Dedeler (Babika)
Silopi Doruklu (Xezayî) Kurdish (Tayan)[74]
Silopi Esenli (Germkê)
Silopi Görümlü (Bêspîn) Kurdish (Bersuva)[76]
Silopi Kapılı (Kukît) Kurdish (Zevkî)[75]
Silopi Kavaközü (Ribêyî) Kurdish (Tayan)[74]
Silopi Kavallı (Nêrwan) Kurdish (Tayan)[78]
Silopi Kösreli (Hesana) Assyrian[73]
Silopi Mahmutlu
Silopi Ortaköy (Gundhedît) Kurdish (Zehiri)[79]
Silopi Ovaköy (Kûrava) Kurdish (Tayan)[78]
Silopi Özgen (Selatûn)
Silopi Pınarözü (Aywan) Kurdish (Tayan)[74]
Silopi Selçik (Derêdefş)
Silopi Üçağaç (Şîvesor)
Silopi Yeniköy (Xirabreşik) Kurdish (Zevkî)[45]
Silopi Yolağzı (Girkûndan) Kurdish (Bersuva)[76]
Uludere Uludere (Qileban) Kurdish (Goyan)[80]
Uludere Andaç (Elemûna) Kurdish (Qeşuran)[34]
Uludere Bağlı (Kulgi) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Bağlıca (Kudin) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Ballı (Şiwêt) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Gülyazı (Bujeh) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Hilal (Şêxan) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Inceler (Ziravik) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Işıkveren (Bîleh) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Ortabağ (Kirur) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Ortaköy (Oriş) Kurdish (Qeşuran)[34]
Uludere Şenoba (Sêgirik) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Taşdelen (Nerweh) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Uzungeçit (Dêra Hînê) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]
Uludere Yemişli (Mergeh) Kurdish (Goyan)[81]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. ^ Area codes page of Turkish Telecom website (in Turkish)
  3. ^ "Li Şirnexê qedexeya hatûçûnê hate ragehandin Kaynak: Li Şirnexê qedexeya hatûçûnê hate ragehandin" (in Kurdish). Rûpelanu. 11 November 2019. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  4. ^ "T.C. Şırnak Valiliği Resmi İnternet Sitesi". www.sirnak.gov.tr. Retrieved 2020-03-26.
  5. ^ a b "Şırnak". Citypopulation.de. Retrieved 20 September 2014.
  6. ^ Vaner, Semih (2005). La Turquie (in French). Fayard. p. 366. ISBN 9782213623696.
  7. ^ Watts, Nicole F. (2010). Activists in Office: Kurdish Politics and Protest in Turkey. University of Washington Press. p. 167. ISBN 9780295990507.
  8. ^ Siirt 1973 (in Turkish). Ajans-Türk Matbaacilak Sanayii. 1973. p. 102.
  9. ^ Üngör, Umut. "Young Turk social engineering : mass violence and the nation state in eastern Turkey, 1913- 1950" (PDF). University of Amsterdam. pp. 244–247. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  10. ^ Aydogan, Erdal. "Üçüncü Umumi Müfettişliği'nin Kurulması ve III. Umumî Müfettiş Tahsin Uzer'in Bazı Önemli Faaliyetleri". Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Bayir, Derya (22 April 2016). Minorities and Nationalism in Turkish Law. Routledge. pp. 139–141. ISBN 978-1-317-09579-8.
  12. ^ Jongerden, Joost (2007-01-01). The Settlement Issue in Turkey and the Kurds: An Analysis of Spatical Policies, Modernity and War. BRILL. p. 53. ISBN 978-90-04-15557-2.
  13. ^ Umut, Üngör. "Young Turk social engineering : mass violence and the nation state in eastern Turkey, 1913- 1950" (PDF). University of Amsterdam. p. 258. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  14. ^ Bozarslan, Hamit (2008-04-17). Fleet, Kate; Faroqhi, Suraiya; Kasaba, Reşat; Kunt, I. Metin (eds.). The Cambridge History of Turkey. Cambridge University Press. p. 343. ISBN 978-0-521-62096-3.
  15. ^ "Turkey's Southeast Beginning to Resemble Syria". al-monitor. June 13, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  16. ^ Jongerden, Joost (2007). The Settlement Issue in Turkey and the Kurds. Brill. pp. 141–142. ISBN 978-90-47-42011-8.
  17. ^ Norwegian Refugee Council/Global IDP Project (4 October 2002). "Profile of internal displacement: Turkey" (PDF). p. 78.
  18. ^ amnesty.org
  19. ^ 18 AUGUST 1992: WHEN ŞIRNAK WAS TURNED INTO A DEAD CITY
  20. ^ nytimes
  21. ^ "AI Index: EUR 44/85/92" (PDF). Amnesty International. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  22. ^ "Turkey's Şırnak Now Nothing But Rubble". Al-Monitor. December 2, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  23. ^ "Şırnak'ta hasar tespiti yappıldı!..2 bin 44 ev yıkıldı". dogan haber ajansi (in Turkish). November 16, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  24. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 30. ISBN 9786058849631.
  25. ^ a b Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 114. ISBN 9786058849631.
  26. ^ a b c Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 131. ISBN 9786058849631.
  27. ^ a b c d Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 121. ISBN 9786058849631.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 76. ISBN 9786058849631.
  29. ^ a b c Peter Alfred, Andrews; Benninghaus, Rüdiger, eds. (1989). Ethnic Groups in the Republic of Turkey. p. 215.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h Çanlı, Mehmet (1998). "Şırnak Beytüşşebap İlçesi ve Aşiretleri Üzerine Bir Deneme". Meslek Hayatının 25. Yılında Prof. Dr. Abdulhaluk Çay Armağanı. p. 289. ISBN 9789759651206.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Çanlı, Mehmet (1998). "Şırnak Beytüşşebap İlçesi ve Aşiretleri Üzerine Bir Deneme". Meslek Hayatının 25. Yılında Prof. Dr. Abdulhaluk Çay Armağanı. p. 285. ISBN 9789759651206.
  32. ^ Çanlı, Mehmet (1998). "Şırnak Beytüşşebap İlçesi ve Aşiretleri Üzerine Bir Deneme". Meslek Hayatının 25. Yılında Prof. Dr. Abdulhaluk Çay Armağanı. p. 30. ISBN 9789759651206.
  33. ^ a b c Çanlı, Mehmet (1998). "Şırnak Beytüşşebap İlçesi ve Aşiretleri Üzerine Bir Deneme". Meslek Hayatının 25. Yılında Prof. Dr. Abdulhaluk Çay Armağanı. p. 290. ISBN 9789759651206.
  34. ^ a b c d Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 104. ISBN 9786058849631.
  35. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 77, 107, 110, 139 and 140. ISBN 9786058849631.
  36. ^ a b Tan, Altan (2018). Turabidin'den Berriye'ye. Aşiretler - Dinler - Diller - Kültürler (in Turkish). pp. 268–269. ISBN 9789944360944.
  37. ^ a b c d Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 80. ISBN 9786058849631.
  38. ^ a b c d e f Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 107. ISBN 9786058849631.
  39. ^ a b Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 77 and 107. ISBN 9786058849631.
  40. ^ a b c d e Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 107 & 110. ISBN 9786058849631.
  41. ^ "Tarihçe". tr. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  42. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 77, 83 & 107. ISBN 9786058849631.
  43. ^ a b c d e f g Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 139. ISBN 9786058849631.
  44. ^ a b Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 133. ISBN 9786058849631.
  45. ^ a b c d Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 106. ISBN 9786058849631.
  46. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 107 and 139. ISBN 9786058849631.
  47. ^ "İdil'de AK Partiye Dev Katılım". 18 July 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  48. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 110. ISBN 9786058849631.
  49. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 107, 110 and 133. ISBN 9786058849631.
  50. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 140. ISBN 9786058849631.
  51. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Tan, Altan (2018). Turabidin'den Berriye'ye. Aşiretler - Dinler - Diller - Kültürler (in Turkish). p. 269. ISBN 9789944360944.
  52. ^ a b c d e f g Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 147. ISBN 9786058849631.
  53. ^ a b c Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 145. ISBN 9786058849631.
  54. ^ "Koruculara 'operasyon' cezası". Evrensel (in Turkish). 23 May 2005. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  55. ^ a b c Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 146–147. ISBN 9786058849631.
  56. ^ a b Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 145. ISBN 9786058849631.
  57. ^ "Eruh - Sosyal ve kültürel yapı" (PDF) (in Turkish). p. 3. Retrieved 31 May 2022.
  58. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 135, 138, 148 and 150. ISBN 9786058849631.
  59. ^ a b Tan, Altan (2018). Turabidin'den Berriye'ye. Aşiretler - Dinler - Diller - Kültürler (in Turkish). p. 268. ISBN 9789944360944.
  60. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Yalçın, Idris (2015). "Geçmişten günümüze İdil'in siyasî, idarî, sosyo-ekonomik ve kültürel tarihî". Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü / Tarih Ana Bilim Dalı: 29.
  61. ^ a b c d e f g h i Yalçın, Idris (2015). "Geçmişten günümüze İdil'in siyasî, idarî, sosyo-ekonomik ve kültürel tarihî". Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü / Tarih Ana Bilim Dalı: 28.
  62. ^ "İdil'de AK Partiye Dev Katılım". 18 July 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  63. ^ Tan, Altan (2018). Turabidin'den Berriye'ye. Aşiretler - Dinler - Diller - Kültürler (in Turkish). p. 122. ISBN 9789944360944.
  64. ^ Aşiretler raporu (in Turkish). Kaynak Yayınları. 1998. p. 231.
  65. ^ Tan, Altan (2018). Turabidin'den Berriye'ye. Aşiretler - Dinler - Diller - Kültürler (in Turkish). p. 169. ISBN 9789944360944.
  66. ^ a b c d e Tan, Altan (2018). Turabidin'den Berriye'ye. Aşiretler - Dinler - Diller - Kültürler (in Turkish). p. 270. ISBN 9789944360944.
  67. ^ Aşiretler raporu (in Turkish). Kaynak Yayınları. 1998. p. 234.
  68. ^ Yalçın, Idris (2015). "Geçmişten günümüze İdil'in siyasî, idarî, sosyo-ekonomik ve kültürel tarihî". Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü / Tarih Ana Bilim Dalı: 30.
  69. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). pp. 107 and 139. ISBN 9786058849631.
  70. ^ Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 77. ISBN 9786058849631.
  71. ^ a b Oran, Baskın (2015). M. K." Adlı Çocuğun Tehcir Anıları: 1915 ve Sonrası (in Turkish).
  72. ^ a b c Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 129. ISBN 9786058849631.
  73. ^ a b Ertaş (2019). "Tarihsel ve Kültürel Boyutlarıyla Şırnak Bölgesindeki Keldaniler ve Müslümanlarla Münasebetleri" (PDF). Asos Journal: The Journal of Academic Social Science (in Turkish): 154. ISSN 2148-2489.
  74. ^ a b c d Atabay, Mithat (2001). Dünden bugüne Silopi: coğrafyası-tarihi ve sosyolojisi (in Turkish). p. 58.
  75. ^ a b Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 151. ISBN 9786058849631.
  76. ^ a b c d Atabay, Mithat (2001). Dünden bugüne Silopi: coğrafyası-tarihi ve sosyolojisi (in Turkish). p. 57.
  77. ^ Atabay, Mithat (2001). Dünden bugüne Silopi: coğrafyası-tarihi ve sosyolojisi (in Turkish). p. 44.
  78. ^ a b c d e Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 81. ISBN 9786058849631.
  79. ^ Atabay, Mithat (2001). Dünden bugüne Silopi: coğrafyası-tarihi ve sosyolojisi (in Turkish). p. 48.
  80. ^ Peter Alfred, Andrews; Benninghaus, Rüdiger, eds. (1989). Ethnic Groups in the Republic of Turkey. p. 218.
  81. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Baz, Ibrahim (2016). Şırnak aşiretleri ve kültürü (in Turkish). p. 125. ISBN 9786058849631.

Coordinates: 37°26′58″N 42°34′28″E / 37.44944°N 42.57444°E / 37.44944; 42.57444