(11436) 1969 QR

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(11436) 1969 QR
Discovery [1]
Discovered by L. Kohoutek
Discovery site Bergedorf Obs.
Discovery date 22 August 1969
Designations
MPC designation (11436) 1969 QR
1969 QR · 1988 DP
main-belt · Flora[2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 47.22 yr (17,246 days)
Aphelion 2.5411 AU
Perihelion 1.9085 AU
2.2248 AU
Eccentricity 0.1422
3.32 yr (1,212 days)
135.76°
0° 17m 49.2s / day
Inclination 7.3467°
239.46°
56.039°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 3.74 km (calculated)[2]
2.65 h[3]
0.24 (assumed)[2]
S[2]
14.3[1][2] · 14.60±0.33[4]

(11436) 1969 QR, is a stony Florian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 3.7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 22 August 1969, by Czech astronomer Luboš Kohoutek at Bergedorf Observatory in Hamburg, Germany.[5]

The S-type asteroid is a member of the Flora family, one of the largest groups of stony asteroids in the main-belt. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.9–2.5 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,212 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.14 and an inclination of 7° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] As no precoveries were taken, the asteroid's observation arc starts with its discovery observation in 1969.[5]

A rotational light-curve for this asteroid was published by several Hungarian astronomers in August 2005. The photometric observations gave a rotation period of 2.65 hours with a brightness variation of 0.27 magnitude (U=2).[3]

The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) assumes an albedo of 0.24 – derived from 8 Flora, the largest member and namesake of its orbital family – and calculates a diameter of 3.7 kilometers.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 11436 (1969 QR)" (2016-11-09 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 14 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (11436)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 8 September 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Székely, P.; Kiss, L. L.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Sárneczky, K.; Csák, B.; Váradi, M.; et al. (August 2005). "CCD photometry of 23 minor planets". Planetary and Space Science. 53 (9): 925–936. arXiv:astro-ph/0504462Freely accessible. Bibcode:2005P&SS...53..925S. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2005.04.006. Retrieved 8 September 2016. 
  4. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 8 September 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "11436 (1969 QR)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 8 September 2016. 

External links[edit]