(137108) 1999 AN10

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(137108) 1999 AN10
1999an10.jpg
Discovery
Discovered by LINEAR
Discovery date 7 January 1999
Designations
MPC designation (137108) 1999 AN10
Apollo asteroid
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 21222 days (58.10 yr)
Aphelion 2.2787 AU (340.89 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 0.63875 AU (95.556 Gm) (q)
1.4587 AU (218.22 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.56212 (e)
1.76 yr (643.51 d)
186.69° (M)
0° 33m 33.948s / day (n)
Inclination 39.932° (i)
314.41° (Ω)
268.30° (ω)
Earth MOID 0.000708904 AU (106,050.5 km)
Jupiter MOID 3.5285 AU (527.86 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 800 - 1800 m[2][3]
Mass ~2.9×1012 kg[4]
Equatorial escape velocity
~2.8 km/h[4]
17.9[1]

(137108) 1999 AN10 is a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) of the Apollo group. It was discovered by LINEAR on January 13, 1999.[5]

On August 7, 2027, this NEA will pass within 0.0026 AU (390,000 km; 240,000 mi) (~1 lunar distance) of the Earth.[6][7][8][9] During the close approach, the asteroid should peak at about apparent magnitude 7.3,[10] and will be visible in binoculars.

1999 AN10 has a well determined orbit with an observation arc of 58 years.[1] It was found by Andreas Doppler and Arno Gnädig in precovery images from 1955.[1] When 1999 AN10 only had an observation arc of 123 days, there was a 1 in 10 million chance that it could return on an impact trajectory in 2039.[11]

On August 7, 1946, the asteroid passed 0.00625 AU (935,000 km; 581,000 mi) from Earth and then 0.00404 AU (604,000 km; 376,000 mi) from the Moon.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 137108 (1999 AN10)". Retrieved 7 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "137108 1999 AN10". The Near-Earth Asteroids Data Base at E.A.R.N. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ Absolute magnitude to diameter conversion table
  4. ^ a b assume radius of 0.650 km; volume of a sphere * assume density of 2.6g/cm³ (though it could be a loose rubble pile) yields a mass of 2.99e12 kg and an escape velocity of 2.82 km/h.
  5. ^ Hannu, Karttunen; Vilppu, Piirola (1999). Astrophysics with the NOT: Proceedings of the conference held in Turku on August 12–15, 1998. University of Turku. p. 270. ISBN 951-29-1615-0. 
  6. ^ Piero Sicoli; Francesco Manca. "Sormano Astronomical Observatory: Table of Next Closest Approaches to the Earth by Asteroids". Astronomical Observatory of Brera. Archived from the original on 1 December 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: 137108 (1999 AN10)" (2006-08-04 last obs (arc=51.5 years)). Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  8. ^ "NEODys (137108) 1999AN10". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, ITALY. Archived from the original on 2009-04-18. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ "MPEC 1999-N21: 1999 AN10". IAU: Minor Planet Center. 1999-07-12. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ "1999AN10 Ephemerides for 7 Aug 2027". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects - Dynamic Site). Retrieved 2011-10-16. 
  11. ^ Paul W. Chodas (1999-05-18). "The Continuing Story Of Asteroid 1999 AN10". Archived from the original on 26 October 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-22. 

External links[edit]