(185851) 2000 DP107

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(185851) 2000 DP107
Discovery [1]
Discovered by LINEAR
Discovery site Lincoln Lab's ETS
Discovery date 29 February 2000
Designations
MPC designation (185851) 2000 DP107
2000 DP107
NEO · PHA · Apollo[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 16.82 yr (6,143 days)
Aphelion 1.8793 AU
Perihelion 0.8512 AU
1.3653 AU
Eccentricity 0.3765
1.60 yr (583 days)
132.20°
0° 37m 4.08s / day
Inclination 8.6716°
358.70°
289.75°
Earth MOID 0.0154 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.860 km (taken)[3]
0.863±0.043 km[4]
1.0±0.1 km[5]
2.769±0.005 h[6]
2.774±0.001 h[7]
2.77447±0.00005 h[8]
2.7745±0.0007 h[4]
2.7754 h[9]
2.7754±0.0002 h[10]
0.111±0.036[5]
0.15 (derived)[3]
M[11] · C[3][12]
18.0[9] · 18.0±0.2 (R)[6] · 18.02±0.2[3][13] · 18.03±0.1[5] · 18.2[1]

(185851) 2000 DP107 is a near-Earth asteroid that is notable because it provided evidence for binary asteroids in the near-Earth population.

Discovery[edit]

The asteroid was discovered on 29 February 2000, by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) program at Lincoln Laboratory's Experimental Test Site, near Socorro, New Mexico.[2]

The binary nature of this asteroid was suggested from radar observations taken with the Goldstone radar antenna on September 22 and 23, 2000, based on an observing proposal by J.-L. Margot and observations by S. J. Ostro and colleagues.[14] Confirming observations were obtained with the Arecibo telescope from September 30 to October 7, 2000.[15]

The binary system[edit]

The 800-meter-diameter primary and the 300-meter-diameter secondary orbit each other with a separation of 2.6 kilometers and a period of 1.76 days.[16]

The density of the primary was calculated using the orbital elements of the binary system, the primary-to-secondary mass ratio, and estimates of the primary size. The primary has a low density of 1.7 g/cm3, which may indicate a "rubble pile" structure containing rocks and voids.

The primary is spheroidal and is spinning at a rate near the breakup point for strengthless bodies. These two features were observed in multiple binary systems, suggesting that near-Earth asteroid binaries form by a mechanism involving spin-up and mass shedding.[16] Currently the most generally accepted spin-up mechanism is the Yarkovsky–O'Keefe–Radzievskii–Paddack effect.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 185851 (2000 DP107)" (2016-12-24 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "185851 (2000 DP107)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d "LCDB Data for (185851)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Naidu, S. P.; Margot, J. L.; Taylor, P. A.; Nolan, M. C.; Busch, M. W.; Benner, L. A. M.; et al. (August 2015). "Radar Imaging and Characterization of the Binary Near-Earth Asteroid (185851) 2000 DP107". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (2): 12. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...54N. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/2/54. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; et al. (November 2012). "Multiple asteroid systems: Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations". Icarus. 221 (2): 1130–1161. arXiv:1604.05384Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012Icar..221.1130M. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.09.013. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  6. ^ a b Polishook, David (July 2012). "Lightcurves and Spin Periods of Near-Earth Asteroids, The Wise Observatory, 2005 - 2010". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (3): 187–192. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..187P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  7. ^ Skiff, Brian A.; Bowell, Edward; Koehn, Bruce W.; Sanborn, Jason J.; McLelland, Kyle P.; Warner, Brian D. (July 2012). "Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Asteroid Photometric Survey (NEAPS) - 2008 May through 2008 December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (3): 111–130. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39..111S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  8. ^ Warner, Brian D.; Stephens, Robert D. (April 2009). "Lightcurve Analysis of Two Binary Asteroids: (76818) 2000 RG79 and (185851) 2000 DP107". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 36 (2): 62–63. Bibcode:2009MPBu...36...62W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Pravec, P.; Scheirich, P.; Kusnirák, P.; Sarounová, L.; Mottola, S.; Hahn, G.; et al. (March 2006). "Photometric survey of binary near-Earth asteroids". Icarus. 181 (1): 63–93. Bibcode:2006Icar..181...63P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.014. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  10. ^ Pravec, P.; Kusnirak, P.; Hicks, M.; Holliday, B.; Warner, B. (October 2000). "2000 DP_107". IAU Circ. (7504). Bibcode:2000IAUC.7504....3P. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  11. ^ Yang, B.; Zhu, J.; Gao, J.; Zhang, H. T.; Zheng, X. Z. (May 2003). "Observations of 2000 DP 107 in NAOC: rotation period and reflectance spectrum". Planetary and Space Science. 51 (6): 411–414. Bibcode:2003P&SS...51..411Y. doi:10.1016/S0032-0633(03)00024-2. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  12. ^ Dandy, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Collander-Brown, S. J. (June 2003). "Optical colors of 56 near-Earth objects: trends with size and orbit". Icarus. 163 (2): 363–373. Bibcode:2003Icar..163..363D. doi:10.1016/S0019-1035(03)00087-3. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  13. ^ Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 22 March 2017. 
  14. ^ IAUC 7496: 2000 S1; 2000 DP107
  15. ^ IAUC 7503: 2000dp; Sats of minor planets
  16. ^ a b Margot, Jean-Luc; et al. (2002). "Binary Asteroids in the Near-Earth Object Population.". Science. 296 (5572): 1445–1448. Bibcode:2002Sci...296.1445M. doi:10.1126/science.1072094. PMID 11951001. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]